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Hawaii during the New Pleistocene is a large archipelago, where many bird and reptile species diversify and flourish. Hawaii has also grown bigger than today (due to both Ice Age and forming of continents), housing more species than modern Hawaii.

Hawaiian RainforestEdit

A rainforest spreading across all of Hawaii, this beautiful habitat relies on the animals that inhabit it to spread the trees and control weeds. It is almost always humid, but rarely a mild snow will show up. Many birds and reptiles diversified, most mammals that were introduced got smaller due to insular dwarfism. A majority of animals evolved to climb trees. Birds are the most widespread fauna. In the late Holocene, the US gave parts of Hawaii to Japan and China. Many Asian animals were introduced.

MammalsEdit

  • Jungle Deer - A deer evolved from black-tailed deer that were on islands, during the Holocene. They got smaller and eventually devolved antlers. They stand about a meter and a half tall.
  • Hawaiian Dylanus - Descended from introduced feral dylanuses. It is an omnivore. It is similar to its ancestors, but is now bigger, about 8.5 feet tall and 500 pounds due to insular gigantism.
  • Hawaiian Sheep - A descendant of feral sheep that were introduced. They have Devolved horns and are slightly smaller than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Goat - Evolved from feral goats that were introduced. Their horns have disappeared as there are no big predators around.
  • Hawaiian Squirrel - Descended from gray squirrels introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are similar to their ancestors, but with reddish-gray fur color (like red squirrels), rather than grayish-brown fur color (unlike grey squirrels).
  • Hawaiian Monkey Rat - Descended from rats that were introduced to Hawaii. They are better at climbing trees than their ancestors, as they evolved prehensile tails and monkey-like feet for climbing. They have a similar niche to South American monkeys.
  • Hawaiian Mouse - Descended from house mice that were introduced to Hawaii. They are similar to their ancestors that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.
  • Hawaiian Dingo - A wild dog, evolved from feral dogs of Hawaii. It resembles an Australian dingo or New Guinea Singing dog. It possess webbing in its paws and is capable of climbing trees.
  • Hawaiian Tree Wallaby - A descendant of brush-tailed rock wallabies introduced during the Holocene. It has evolved convergent to tree kangaroos.
  • Hawaiian Ground Wallaby - A descendant of brush-tailed rock wallabies introduced during the Holocene. It is similar to its ancestors, but is now more suited to lowland forests of Hawaii rather than rocky hills of Australia.
  • Hawaiian Opossum Wallaby - Descended from brush-tailed rock wallabies introduced during the Holocene. It resembles a hybrid between a wallaby and a Virginia opossum, and it has a similar niche and diet to Virginia opossums.
  • Hawaiian Mongoose - A small mongoose, descended from the ones introduced during the Holocene to control rat populations. Its population is controlled by dingoes and Spotted cats.
  • Spotted Cat - A descendant of feral cats, it resembles an Asian leopard cat, and is about the size of a medium-sized dog.
  • Hawaiian Pig - A descendant of feral pigs that resembles a cross between a boar and a peccary. It is about the size of a small llama. Unlike its ancestors, it is no longer an omnivore, it is now completely herbivorous.
  • Hawaiian Monkey - A descendant of African or Asian monkeys that lived in the zoo during the Holocene.
  • Hawaiian Orangutan - Descended from Orangutan that rafted their way across the Pacific Ocean.
  • Hawaiian Dwarves - Small descendants of homo ferus native to Hawaii. They are omnivores. Similar to their ancestors, but are about 3 feet tall.
  • Hawaiian Wood Elves - Descended from wood elves from another universe. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Pixies - Descended from pixies that were brought from another universe. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Fairies - Descended from fairies that were brought from another universe. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Dogman - Descended from Michigan dogmen that were brought from another universe. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but are smaller, about 4 feet tall, due to insular dwarfism.

BirdsEdit

  • Apapane - A small red and black bird common amongst Hawaii.
  • Nene - A species of goose endemic to Hawaii.
  • Giant Nene - Deecended from nenes that grew bigger (about the size of an emu), became completely flightless, lost their webbings & their ability to swim, and is much more aggressive (in response to more predators) than any geese alive today. They are herbivores. They resemble a hybrid between a nene and a moa-nalo.
  • Pacific Golden Plover - A long-legged bird found on Hawaii.
  • Duru - A small omnivorous gallus, that feeds on small rodents and plant seed. It resembles a grey-brown tragopan.
  • Yellow-billed Cardinal - A cardinal with a red head and a dark gray and white body.
  • Hawaiian Peacock - A peacock that is red in color, with green, black and blue tail feathers.
  • Hawaiian Moon Macaw - A descendant of a macaw that probably migrated from South America to California, to Hawaii. They are nocturnal.
  • Hawaiian Day Macaw - Descended from Macaws that probably migrate from South America to California, to Hawaii. Unlike moon macaws, they are diurnal.
  • Japanese White-Eye - A bird endemic to Hawaii and Japan.
  • Hawaiian Duck - A Hawaiian subspecies of mallard duck.
  • Hawai'i Elepaio - A small bird found on Hawaiian Islands.
  • Hawaiian Merganser - A burrowing, terrestrial merganser, that is flightless only in some populations.
  • Laysan Finch - A species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, that is endemic to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
  • Sunshine starling - A descendant of the common starling, it evolved to prey on small insects, like ants, termite and bees. It is the faster bird in Hawaii, capable of flying of speeds of 120 miles an hour.
  • Archaeopteryx - Its ancestors escaped from dinosaur parks. It is a carnivore that feeds on insects and sometimes fish. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Confuciusornis - Descended from confuciusornis that were released by feral dylanuses after humans are mostly gone. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors. Despite competition with modern birds, many species of Mesozoic birds (including confuciusornis) are thriving.
  • Hawaiian Avisaurus - Descended from escaped avisaurus. They are omnivores. They fill the niche similar to that of African hornbills, other than that, they are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Enantiornis - Descended from enantiornis that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Sinornis - Descended from sinornis that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Longipteryx - Descended from longipteryx that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They feed on insects and fish. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Oceania Alexornis - Descended from alexornis that were released by feral dylanuses after humans are mostly gone. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Gastornis - Descended from Gastornis that escaped from Cenozoic parks. It is a herbivore. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Dodo - Descended from dodos that escaped from Cenozoic parks. It was brought back by time travel. It is a bit faster although not much is changed.
  • New Moa-Nalo - Descended from moa-nalos that were brought back through time travel and were reintroduced to Hawaiia by humans. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but there are now more species of moa-nalos than there were before their previous extinction in the Early Holocene, about 27 species (rather than just 4 species)
  • Hawaiian Moa - Descended from Moas that escaped from Cenozoic parks. It is a herbivore. It is similar to, but smaller and can reproduce faster than, its ancestors.

ReptilesEdit

  • Hawaiian Giant Tortoise - A descendant of the leopard tortoise, it is a keystone species, responsible for the control of weeds. It's about a meter high and two meters long.
  • Hawaiian Tree Snake - Descended from Brown tree snakes that were introduced to Hawaii in Holocene. They are greener in color and are bigger than their ancestors, about 6 feet long. It's a non-venomous snake, so it captures its prey by constricting its prey like boas, and then killing its prey by biting its prey with its strong jaw.
  • Tree Iguana - A descendant of green iguanas, that probably evolved from iguanas that were introduced there. They evolved a thin-long tail, a slim body, strong limbs and a curved digits on it's fingers.
  • Giant Monitor Lizard - A descendant of monitor lizards introduced to Hawaii. The characteristics of this lizard that it is about the size of a komodo dragon, hence its name.
  • Hawaiian Chameleon - Descended from chameleons that were introduced to Hawaii by people. They feed on small insects.
  • Hawaiiachelys - A meiolanid turtle. Bigger than a saltwater crocodile. Also has a club tail.
  • Hawaiiosaurus - Descended from Dilophosaurus that lives in Hawaii. It is much smaller than its ancestors (about 15 feet long and 230 pounds) and now has a frill to look bigger and poison to paralyze its prey, much like Jurassic park's dilophosaurus. It is the top predator of Hawaii.
  • Microraptor - Descended from Microraptors that escaped from dinosaur parks. It is a carnivore that feeds on insects, smaller reptiles, and small mammals. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Compsognathus - Descended from Compsognathus that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hesperonychus - Its ancestors escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiioraptor - Descended from Eoraptors that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Oviraptorids - Descended from Oviraptors that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are omnivores. There are about 198 species of Oviraptorids of Hawaii today. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Simosuchus - Its ancestors escaped from dinosaur parks. It is a herbivore. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Kloon - A small flightless moa-like pterosaur. Their ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Wandle - A very large flightless moa-like pterosaur. Their ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Lizardman - Descended from dinosauroids from another universe. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but are now only about as intelligent as the orangutan.

AmphibianEdit

  • Cane Toad - Common in Hawaii, a large species of toad.
  • Giant Bulltoad - Descended from cane toads that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are similar to the long-extinct beelzebufo frog in size, appearance, locomotion, and niche, feeding on small reptiles, small amphibians, and small mammals.
  • Hawaiian Newt - Descended from salamanders that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.
  • Hawaiian Salamander - Descended from salamanders that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.

InvertebratesEdit

  • Hawaiian Centipede - A descendant of the common house centipede. It is about 1ft in length and has longer legs than the house centipede.
  • Hawaiian Giant Crab - Descended from coconut crabs that were introduced. They are the world's largest terrestrial crabs, about 130 pounds bigger than any of today's terrestrial crab species.

PlantsEdit

  • Bitter fruit - Descended from feral pineapple that were grown as a crop for humans. It is extremely larger than it's descendants, about the size of an apple tree. It's fruit is also thinner and softer.

Net-NavisEdit

  • Bass.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Bass.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Bass.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They can hover, have darkness, Aura powers, and are almost invincible, having many powers and are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items they need in order to survive) or want. They are nocturnal, as they can blend in the dark to hunt deer, ibex, wild sheep, and other animals. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games.
  • Megaman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Megaman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Megaman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They have many powers and are almost invincible, they are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive). They are mostly diurnal, but can be nocturnal to keep an eye out for their only natural predators, Bass.EXEs and Elecman.EXEs. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are peaceful, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime, but can fight back if threatened.
  • Protoman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Protoman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Protoman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They have many powers, and are almost invincible, they are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive) or want. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are sometimes hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime.
  • Elecman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Elecman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Elecman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They can hover, have electric powers, and are very strong, having many powers and are almost impossible to avoid, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive) or want. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime.
  • Plantman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Plantman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Plantman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They have many powers, and are almost invincible, they are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive) or want. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are sometimes hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime.
  • Hawaiian Dwarf Gutsman.EXE - Descended from clones of Gutsman.EXE that escaped from laboratories. They can no longer talk, unlike their ancestors, as talking doesn't help them survive for a non-humanoid creature, so their only vocalizations are now just snorts, grunts, growls, and bellows. They are herbivores that feed on roots, tubers, grass, ferns, cycads, and leaves. Other than that, they are similar to their ancestors, but are now much smaller, about the size of a chimpanzee, due to insular dwarfism.

Hawaiian Rivers Edit

A large river in Hawaii.

MammalsEdit

  • Hawaiian River Dolphin - Evolved from bottlenose dolphins that can now tolerate both salt and fresh water. They are similar to the long-extinct baiji river dolphin in appearance, niche, locomotion, and size because of convergent evolution.

​FishEdit

  • Inland Swordtail- Descended from swordtails that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.
  • Giant Guppy - Descended from guppies that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are bigger and more herbivorous than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Catfish - Descended from catfishes that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are now bigger, about the size of an average size pig, and is more herbivorous than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian MediumMouth Bass - Descended from a bass fish that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are now bigger and more carnivorous than their ancestors.
  • Celestial Koi - Descended from koi fish that were washed out of man-made ponds into Hawaiian rivers. They are bigger than their ancestors, and can live for about 300 years, making it the longest living fish on Earth.
  • Inland Goldfish - Descended from domestic goldfishes that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are now bigger and more omnivorous than their ancestors.
  • Gobies - Different species of fish native to Hawaii. Many species of gobies are still alive today.
  • Cichlids - Different species of these fish live in Africa, Asia, North America, and Hawaii. Many species are still alive today.

Reptiles Edit

  • Hawaiian Crocodile - Descended from saltwater crocodiles that escaped from the zoo. They are now bigger than their ancestors.

Hawaiian ShorelinesEdit

This is where many seashore animals live.

MammalsEdit

  • Hawaiian Tusked Dolphin - A desendant of rough-toothed dolphin. Two teeth like tusks poke through the bottom jaw.
  • Hawaiian Common Whale - Descended from beluga whales that migrated to Hawaii. They are similar to other beluga whales, but with black on top of its body and white on the bottom.
  • Hawaiian Tusked Whale - Descended from beluga whales that migrated to Hawaiian shorelines. They evolved two tusks, one about 1 ft and the other about three feet long, they are similar to the extinct narwhal relative, Odobenocetops.
  • Humpback whale - A large species of whale. Still alive today.
  • Right Whale - A species of baleen whale. Same species alive today.
  • Bottlenose Dolphin - A species of dolphin. Same species alive today.
  • Rough-Toothed Dolphin - A species of dolphin. Same species alive today.
  • Hawaiian Monk Seal - A species of Monk Seal native to Hawaii.
  • Hawaiian Common Seal - Descended from harbor seals that migrated to Hawaii. It is similar to its ancestors, but is slightly larger, with less fat, and is browner in color than its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Sea Lion - Descended from sea lions that migrated to Hawaii. They are similar to other sea lion species.
  • Hawaiian Mermaid - Descended from mermaids that were brought from Animal Planet's mermaid documentary universe. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.

BirdsEdit

  • Hawaiian Penguin - Descended from Galapagos penguins that migrated to Hawaii. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Hesperornis - Descended from Hesperornis that lives on Hawaiian beaches. They feed on fish and squid. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Ichthyornis - Descended from Ichthyornis that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They feed on fish. They are similar to their ancestors. Despite competition with gull species, Ichthyornis are thriving.

ReptilesEdit

  • Shorerunner - A small pterosaur species of Hawaii. Their ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They behave very much like seagulls. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.

InvertebratesEdit

  • Coconut Grab - A semi-terrestrial shelled cephalopod. Its ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They have a similar niche to coconut crabs. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.

Skull islandEdit

In the Late Holocene, humans brought Skull Island to life through universe travel. Many species from King Kong universe lives here.

MammalsEdit

  • Skull Island Dylanus - Descended from feral dylanuses that were either introduced to Skull Island or had rafted from Hawaii to Skull Island or both. They resemble a hybrid between an American common dylanus and an American killer dylanus. They are omnivores. They are peaceful like their ancestors.
  • Skull lsland Zwim - Descended from zwims that were released to Skull Island by dylanuses. Despite competition from rats, they are thriving. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors from The New Dinosaurs universe.
  • Skull Island Weasel - Descended from domestic ferrets (despite their name) that were stowed away by Humans in the Late Holocene. There are more than 1,200 species of weasels in Skull Island. They are omnivores. They are similar to mainland weasels more than their ancestors.
  • Oceania Mongoose - Descended from stowed away mongooses that lives in Skull Island. There are more than 1,670 species of Oceania mongooses, ranging from meerkat-like forms, to egyptian mongoose-like forms, to civet-like forms, to fossa-like forms, to binturong-like forms. They are all omnivores. Despite competition with Skull Island weasels (another introduced species), all Oceania mongoose species are thriving.
  • Skull Island Gaur - A subspecies of gaur that lives in Skull Island. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Brown Bear - Descended from escaped brown bears that live in Skull Island. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Wild Pig - Descended from introduced wild boars. There are more than 1,230 species of wild pigs in Skull Island, ranging from warthog-like forms, to babirusa-like forms, to European wild boar-like forms, to peccary-like forms. They are all omnivores like their ancestors.
  • Oceania Elk - Descended from elk that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are oceania gray wolf's main food source. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Tiger - Descended from escaped bengal/siberian tiger hybrids that live in Skull Island. There are 127 species of Skull Island tigers, ranging from bengal tiger-like forms, lion-like forms, jaguar/leopard-like forms, cheetah-like forms, and smilodon-like forms. They are all carnivores. Despite competion with carnivorous dinosaurs, they are thriving really well.
  • Skull Island Hyena - Descended from hyenas that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Oceania Gray Wolf - Descended from escaped gray wolves that live in Skull Island. They are carnivores. Just like their ancestors, they communicate by howling. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Oceanic Deer - Other than elk, other species of deer (except moose or reindeer) were introduced to Skull Island. There are more than 2,890 species of Oceanic deer. They are all herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Chalicothere - Many of Skull Island's chalicotheres are descended from Ancylotherium and Chalicotherium that escaped from Cenozoic parks. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Zebra - Descended from escaped zebras that live in Skull Island. They are herbivores. Unlike their ancestors, they are dark-brown and black (instead of black and white).
  • Skull Island Horse - Descended from feral horses that live in Skull Island. They are herbivores. They resemble a zebroid (a horse/zebra hybrid).
  • Skull Island Bison - Descended from one species of bison that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but with horns that are thicker, longer, and stronger than their ancestors, due to new dinosaur predators.
  • Skull Island Buffalo - Descended from introduced water buffaloes. There are about 217 species of Skull Island buffaloes, ranging from Cape buffalo-like species to aurochs-like species.
  • Skull Island Antelope - Descended from many species of antelopes that were either introduced to Skull Island by humans, or had escaped from zoos/safari parks, or both. There are more than 2,850 species of Skull Island antelopes. All species of antelopes are herbivores. Many antelope species of Skull Island are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Giraffe - Descended from giraffes that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Camel - Descended from either dromedary/bactrian camel hybrids that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are herbivores. They resemble a wild bactrian camel, but with shorter fur and has just one hump on its back like a dromedary camel.
  • Skull Island Rhinoceros - Descended from white rhinos that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors. Despite competition with ceratopsid dinosaurs, they are thriving.
  • Oceania Island Elephant - Descended from escaped Asian elephants that live in Skull Island. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors. Despite competition with Skull Island's sauropods, they are thriving.
  • Skull Island Mammoth - Despite its name, It's actually a descendant of escaped Asian elephants. They are herbivores. They resemble a cross between an Asian elephant and a Columbian mammoth.
  • Skull Island Giant Mammoth - Another species of Skull Island's mammoths, they are about 2 times bigger than v.rex, so they can now defend themselves against giant carnivorous dinosaurs (except godzillas). They are the largest mammals of Skull Island (about 5 tons bigger than king kong himself). They are herbivores that feed on leaves, ferns, horsetails, cycads, spineless cactuses, vines, and grass.
  • Terapusmordax - Terapusmordax obscenus, is a large, vicious, sociable volucerictid from the uplands of Skull Island. It has a wingspan of 8-10 feet. Lord of the skies over Skull Island is no bird of prey or pterodactyl pterosaur, but a naked-skinned, bat-winged rodent with a stench to make noses bleed. The Terapusmordax, in appearance a hideous mix of bat and naked mole rat, is in fact a species of flying rodent. It is the largest of the volucerictids, a family of winged rodents peculiar to Skull Island. A handful of the related species exist everywhere else on the island, including Volucerictis and the howlers, but all are dwarfed by this monster. Terapusmordax have thin, almost transparent skin and light but strong bones. They have good eyesight and are excellent flyers. Despite their size, they are quite maneuverable, able to tip and roll in the air in pursuit of one another or winged prey. Terapusmordax make their homes in vast caverns in the uplands, hanging bat-like from the cave ceilings by their feet at night. The cave floors are littered with the feces of their colonies, which can number in the hundreds. Their waste contains pungent chemicals that, in sufficient quantity, induce watering eyes and burning nostrils in other species. The reek of this accumulated waste is so overpowering that it drives would-be larger predators away from the colony, guaranteeing the safety of the young and infirm. Excrement often cakes the bellies of these of the creatures, but they appear unaffected. Indeed, this be a defense in and of itself. Even when on the ground, far from the colony, a Terapusmordax is unlikely to be bothered by flightless carnivores due to the nauseating stench. Terapusmordax colonies are matriarchies, ruled by pugnacious females awash with male hormones to increase their size and strength. These brutish females roost, forage, and share the raising of young together. The solitary males nest in small satellite bachelor colonies of a dozen or so individuals for mutual protection at night. Not being social, they bicker constantly. Among males, infection due to nips and scratches is common. They are kept at a distance from the female colony due to their propensity to kill pups in order to bring their mothers back into season. Males are driven out of the nest while still young. The solitary male pups pick each other off, to avoid potential rivals later in life. The unprotected male pups also fall prey to other predators. Consequently, adult females outnumber males, due to the extra protection living as a group affording female pups. Terapusmordax are omnivorous, eating fruit and nuts from the jungle and plucking lizards and small dinosaurs from the ground when they can get them. They often catch food on the wing, chasing birds and other fellow flying creatures. Common prey are vultursaurs and Volucerictis, which they catch at dusk.
  • Skull Island White Bat - Noctadorior alba, is a small, blind, very bat-like volucerictid from the jungles of Skull Island. It has a 7-9 inch wingspan. White bats are not true bats, but an analogous species of rodent. However, like bats, they have huge ears and hunt by sonar. Their eyes are almost entirely gone and covered over with skin. They hunt insects and small centipedes at night.
  • Skull Island Rat - A common, burrowing rat from the jungles of Skull Island. It is a common prey item for many predators. Their ancestors were originally stowaways on the boats of the first humans to settle on Skull Island.
  • Burglar Monkey - Perfossor novus, is a dark-furred lorisid from the jungle canopy of Skull Island. It measures 1-2 feet long. The curious burglar monkeys are not true monkeys at all, but relatives of lorises (making them primitive primates akin to the ancestors of modern monkeys and apes). The lithe little opportunists clamber along the high branches of the canopy, eating fruit, nuts, flower buds, and insects, but also have a taste for bird and lizard eggs, taking them straight out of their nests at night. Burglar monkeys are not especially fast or possessing of impressive defenses like many of the island's denizens. To avoid predators, they curl up in communal dens inside holes in trees during the day, emerging at dusk when their keen senses give them an edge.
  • Skull Island Fur Seal - It is a light brown arctocephaline eared seal from the coast of Skull Island. There are a few beaches in the more sheltered inlets between the rocky headlands. These are the transitory homes of Skull Island fur seals and sea turtles. Rich in fat, they can be prey to sauropsid predators like Tartarusaurus and Nefundusaurus. Unguarded pups can be taken by Peracerdon.
  • Skull Island Lemur - Descended from many species of lemurs that escaped from zoos or safari parks. They are all omnivores like their ancestors. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Monkey - While burglar monkeys are lorises (not true monkeys), Skull Island monkeys are true monkeys. They are descended from many species of South American monkeys (howler monkeys, capuchin monkeys, etc.), African monkeys (baboons, vervet monkeys, swamp monkeys, mandrills, drills, geledas, African macaques, patas monkeys, etc.), and Asian monkeys (Asian macaques, langaurs, etc.) that escaped from zoos or safari parks. All Skull Island Monkeys are omnivores like their ancestors. They are all similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Chimpanzee - Descended from orangutans (despite their name) that rafted to Skull Island. They are omnivores. They resemble a chimpanzee, but with flater teeth, have a more herbivorous diet, and are less aggressive than true chimpanzees, only slighty less aggressive than gorillas. They are about the size of true chimpanzees.
  • Skull Island Gibbon - Descended from orangutans (despite their names) that rafted to Skull Island. They are omnivores. They resemble a gibbon, but are reddish-browner in color (more like that of an orangutan) than true gibbons. They are about the size of true gibbons. They also have a similar niche and acts like true gibbons.
  • Skull Island Orangutan - Descended from orangutans that rafted to Skull Island. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors. They are about the size of a Sumatran orangutan.
  • Skull Island Gorilla - Descended from orangutans (despite their name) that rafted to Skull Island. They are herbivores. They resemble a gorilla, but with a flatter head and are slightly skinnier. They are about the size of Western lowland gorillas.
  • Megaprimatus Kong - Also known as king kong, it is the largest primate on earth, about the size of a V-Rex. Despite this, they are herbivores. They are gentle giants. They are similar to their ancestors.

Synapsids (Mammal-Like Reptiles)Edit

  • Monstrutalpus - It is a large, green, herbivorous tapinocephalian from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 12-15 feet long. The broad-bodied Monstrutalpus is a ground forager of the deep jungle. Named for its excavating talents (the genus translation being "monster mole"), Monstrutalpus has strong forelimbs for digging out the tubers, roots and fungi upon which it lives. The beast's strong sense of smell leads to it the location of choice items buried several feet underground. Flat, spatula-shaped teeth cut and slice through thick roots while, farther back in the mouth, broad, crushing molars, powered by huge jaw muscles, render even the toughest matter to pulp and mash. In the breeding season, Monstrutalpus females exude a powerful musk that will draw males from far and wide. It is not uncommon for several males to follow a female around for days, trying to block one another's advances, while the female takes her pick of mates, usually more than one, from among the hopeful suitors. Eggs are buried to develop on their own, the young emerging only after digging their way to the surface.
  • Pugbat - Turpis porcarius, is a strange, flat-faced, flying, nocturnal, bat-like non-mammalian cynodont from the lowland plains of Skull Island. It has a 2-3 foot wingspan. Flying non-mammalian cynodonts, pugbats are nocturnal pack hunters specializing in taking down large prey. Families of up to 15 adults and their young nest in hollow trunks and sheltered hollows created by fallen trees on the edges of the lowland plains, emerging at sundown to hunt in the half-light before full dark. Dozing grazers, such as Ferrucutus, in the open lands are their primary prey. Spooking the herd with eerie calls, the pack will swoop down en masse on young or sick individuals they have isolated amid the throng, instinctively aiming for the throat and stomach, where thinner skin grants access to more blood vessels. Ferocious bacteria in the pugbats’ saliva can bring on spontaneous coronary shock in prey, dying of heart failure in a matter of minutes after being savaged. Few prey Animals voluntarily seek conflict with the pugnacious little flyers. Their mouths are large and rowed with tiny, very sharp teeth. The bald head allows it to be plunged deep inside carcasses in search of tender meat. Among pugbats, males and females differ in their wingtips. In males, who are larger than females, the phalanges is split at the distal joint, allowing greater finger mobility.
  • Malamagnus - 15-20 feet long. Large herd-dwelling reptiles, Malamagnus's browsed reeds, water lilies and shrubs in the shallows in and around the waterways. Vulnerable to predators such as Torulodons, they tended to browse along the riverbanks or in the shallows to afford carnivores less cover for ambushes and allow for a quick retreat to deep water. In the river, their size kept them safe from all but the largest of the aquatic predators. Smaller terrestrial threats were seen off through intimidation-all adult members of the herd took part in guarding their territory aggressively from rivals or unwelcome encroachers. In the breeding season, Malamagnus's became especially aggressive and intolerant, staking out and jealously guarding territories. Large, rubbery eggs were laid in small clutches amid vegetation near the river's edge. The young hatched well developed and were quick to join the herd, growing substantially in their first year. Malamagnus's had enormous jaws for reptiles their size. While herbivorous, their impressive tusklike teeth were employed in contests of dominace. Rivals locked jaws like battling stags and tried to force one another aside. Powerful neck muscles were the key to the contest, and young males would hone their strength in mock battles.
  • Dinocanisaurus - It is a large, sociable, pack-hunting non-mammalian cynodont from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 3-4 feet long. Armored cynodonts, Dinocanisaurus live in tight packs of up to a dozen adults and as many pups. The aggressive little predators are highly social, depending upon one another for defense of the den, their territorial boundaries, and coordinated hunting. Pack life is dictated by a strict hierarchy, with a matriarch in charge and all other packs members having clearly defined roles. Young hatch in heavily guarded, shallow dens, scraped out beneath trees or in cracks in the rocky forest floor. In good hunting years, several females might hatch pups and raise them together, but in lean seasons the matriarch will destroy the eggs or hatchlings of lower-ranking females to reduce competition with her own young. Dauntless little hunters, they prowl the jungle floor and as high into the trees as they can climb, taking small and large prey (such as Hylaeornis) as a team. Dinocanisaurus communicate with whistles and snorts through their nostrils, coordinating their actions to outflank and corner prey. Though complex, their pack behavior is not as sophisticated as that of the bigger Venatosaurus, which will prey upon them, given the chance.
  • Bidensaurus - Bidensaurus mactabilis, is a small, striped, nocturnal gorgonopsid from the uplands of Skull Island. It measures 5-6 feet long. The Bidensaurus is a dog-sized nocturnal gorgonopsid closely related to the Lycaesaurus of the lowlands and the impressive fan-backed Gladiodon. These carnivores are solitary, except in the breeding season, when mated pairs might stay together for several months. A Bidensaurus uses an acute sense of smell to sniff out small or sleeping large prey in the dead of night.
  • Lycaesaurus - Lycaesaurus kirkii, is a sociable, lowland plains-dwelling gorgonopsid from Skull Island. It measures 4-5 feet long. The Lycaesaurus is an intelligent, dog-sized predator that hunts in the grasses. Mating for life, pairs dig burrows in the volcanic soil and line them with dry vegetation for their pups (most often twins). They take a wide range of prey, feeding on anything smaller than themselves, and often follow larger carnivores like V. rexes in the hopes of scavenging morsels from their kills, or using the cover of one of their attacks to grab undefended young dinosaurs, such as that of Ferrucutus. The cunning Lycaesaurus have developed tactics to lure Brutornis mothers off their valuable eggs. Conspicuously approaching the nest to catch the bird's eye, one Lycaesaurus will act as a decoy, luring the protective mother off her clutch while the other raids the unattended nest. A valuable protein source, the melon-sized eggs are worth the risk of teasing such a dangerous larger predator. The decoy individual has to judge its lead carefully. If it goes too far, the mother Brutornis might abandon pursuit to return to her eggs; too close and the ploy could turn to disaster, the would-be egg thieves becoming dinner for the starving parent bird.
  • Gladiodon - Gladiodon igneospinus, is a bizarre, colorful gorgonopsid from the uplands of Skull Island. It measures 8-18 feet long. The resplendent and predatory Gladiodon (with its fiery stripes, featherlike dorsal growths, and long saber teeth) is a dandy gorgonopsid. It preys on herbivores, including Bifurcatops and chaly-topses, but specializes in taking other predators, like Malevolusaurus. A Gladiodon pounces on prey, inflicting fatal wounds with its scimitar-like fangs. Releasing the victim, it will track the prey as it staggers away until overcome by blood loss. The magnificent color scheme plays a part in the elaborate courting rituals of Gladiodon. In the breeding season, they gather in traditional sites to strut and pose, shaking their dazzling dorsal fans and yawning to show off their teeth. Males display to entice mates, while females wander among them, choosing those that most impress them.
  • Carver - Carocarptor interfector, is a larger, powerful eutherapsid from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 25-33 feet long. Heavily built therapsid carnivores that prowl the jungle floor and lower boughs, Carvers are limber hunters with a dexterity to match their great strength. They mate for life, forming strong pair bonds and hunting together silently. Although days and nights differ little in the deepest recesses of the jungle, where sunlight rarely penetrates, Carvers are mostly nocturnal predators. Their eyesight is keen and their hearing and sense of smell even keener, but their real edge in hunting is a specialized heat-sensing organ located on the snout. Analogous in function to the pit organ of many snake species, this remarkable adaptation exposes concealed prey by their thermal signature. Preying on almost anything that crosses their path as they prowl the dark, the powerful jaws of Carvers can inflict savage wounds. They can even bring down prey animals as large as a juvenile Diablosaurus or an Asperdorsus. Carvers are protective of their kills, often dragging them several miles through the jungle to a defendable position before dining. A pair of Carvers can spend several days consuming a carcass, dozing and eating at a leisurely pace, until there is nothing left. Everything is eaten. Their powerful jaws can crush bone, leaving little for any scavengers waiting patiently for the scraps. Most small to midsized herbivorous inhabitants of the jungle are potential Carver prey, but they commonly take young tree-tops. The agile ceratopsians are faster through the dense jungle, so the almost felid-like Carvers take advantage of overhanging boughs or fallen trees to approach hidden from above, remaining concealed until within pouncing range. Also a common prey for Carvers is the 9-foot-long Pugiodorsus. Alertness is their greatest defense, necessitating great stealth on the part of Carvers, even at night. Their bladed shoulder spikes, backward facing to protect them from pursuing predators, forces Carvers to take care when making killing bites. A wise hunter makes sure to bite low, aiming for the stomach or neck. Hebeosaurus is slow-moving and myopic, but surprisingly difficult to quickly kill. A thick neck and reinforced throat pipe make delivering a fatal bite harder than for most similar-sized prey. Generally the 18-foot-long herbivores are brought down by pairs of Carvers acting together to subdue and maim. Hebeosaurus intend to die messily and slowly at the hands of a predator.
  • Malevolusaurus, Malevolusaurus perditor, is a large, omnivorous sphenacodontine sphenacodontid from the uplands of Skull Island, descended from Dimetrodon. It measures 20-24 feet long. Pugnacious and ill-tempered, the burly Malevolusaurus is an opportunistic omnivorous pelycosaur of the highlands. It scavenges carrion or steals wounded live prey from other predators, digs smaller animals from burrows, and uproots plants for their roots and tubers. The distinctive sails, an heirloom of Permian ancestry, are an adaptation Malevolusaurus employ to warm themselves in the morning, boosting their energy levels for the day. Many are badly torn or otherwise scarred, a result of dominance battles between the fiercely territorial creatures. Males have knobby “crowns” with which they will butt one another, but biting and clawing are common. Malevolusaurus lay their eggs in scrapes on the sunniest slopes where they will be naturally warmed. The greatest threat to newly hatched young comes from their own kind (80 percent of young fall prey to hungry adults in their first year). This cannibalism is strangely an effective population control, as little else eats them. Only the saber-toothed Gladiodon hunts full-grown Malevolusaurus.
  • Deinoplaceras - Descended from Placerias that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are herbivores. They are much bigger (about 28 feet long and 5 tons) than their ancestors.

ReptilesEdit

  • V. Rex - Also known as Vastatosaurus rex, Vastatosaurus rex is a large, unique tyrannosaurine tyrannosaurid from Skull Island, descended from Tyrannosaurus. It measures 40-50 feet long. The biggest terrestrial predator on Skull Island is the V. rex. Like their prehistoric fellow tyrannosaurs, Skull Island V. rexes have little competition for their spot as top predators. In spite of their size, they can turn on a surprising burst of speed for short periods, clocking up to 25 mph for limited stretches in pursuit of prey. V. rexes have developed many unique features over the 66 million years since the Mesozoic Era, but they still bare several recognizable similarities to their Cretaceous ancestors. V. rexes have large heads, filled with long teeth that are constantly being regrown to replace those lost in conflict. Their heads are intensely reinforced with heavy bone. As the primary weapon of the tyrannosaurine, an individual V. rex’s head is often distinctive, being covered in scars and calluses. Abnormal bone growths form from old battles with prey, other predators, rivals, or even mates. Narrow, short ribcages and a large gap between the ribs and hips allow V. rexes surprising flexibility for animals of their size, a necessary adaptation to the broken terrain of Skull Island. Their forelimbs are small in comparison with the rest of their bodies, not growing as fast as the rest of the animal so that by adulthood this disparity in spite of their size is strikingly evident. Early tyrannosaurids had only two fingers on their forelimbs but Skull Island V. rexes have three. When dragging carcasses, the tiny arms help pin the meat against the body and prevent it swinging around. While juvenile V. rexes tend to cluster in the thick jungle interior, the large adults hunt mostly in the open areas of the lowlands where they can move freely. Large males seek the most open territories while mature females usually stake claim to areas on the fringes of the thicker forests where they can find hidden nesting sites. Fiercely territorial, adult V. rexes suffer no rival encroachments on their hunting grounds. Territorial boundaries are regularly marked with urine, and dawn roaring will reinforce claims to land. Neighbors can tell much about the physical condition of the owner of a territory from the smell of its urine and the sound of a roar. Displays and scenting minimize potentially dangerous confrontations between individuals of different sizes. Occasionally disputes between evenly matched V. rexes can erupt. With the threat of serious injury, these confrontations are usually resolved with intense roaring matches in which each individual attempts to intimidate the other into giving way. However, when this fails, violence ensues. Older V. rexes bare the crisscrossing scars of many such fights. Exceptions to their solitary existence are made in the breeding season. Males will leave their hunting grounds to seek out females in season. If the female is receptive, she will accept the male, and the couple might stay together, hunting in her territory for several days before she tires of him and sends him on his way. Adolescent V. rexes (seeking to hone their hunting skills) will sometimes follow adults at a safe distance during the mating season, watching and occasionally stealing meals from unguarded kills. Taking advantage of the season of nomadic adult males, bold adolescents might move in to claim currently undefended territory as their own. V. rexes are capable of tackling very large prey species, but their massive size is often employed to intimidate smaller carnivores into giving up their kills. While effective hunters, a meal is safer to obtain by simply appropriating someone else’s carcass. V. rexes have intensely acidic stomachs, capable of processing even the most rancid rotting meat, a feature that serves the species well as heavyweight scavengers. Their massive jaws can exert astounding pressure, shattering bones to expose the rich marrow less robust predators are unable to reach Kill As hunters, V. rexes tend to employ ambush tactics, using cover in and around waterholes or forested areas to surprise prey. Ligocristus are the primary prey of adult V. rexes, being the most abundant. Ferrucutus and Brontosaurus are more dangerous prospects; however, if a young or sick individual can be separated from the protection of the herd it can be an easy kill. Any smaller species are likely game, though most are too small to provide more than a snack. The greatest challenger for the hunters lies in not being spotted by prey. Adult V. rexes are dark in coloring and, despite their size, can be surprisingly stealthy, using shadows near the fringes of scrub, rocky outcroppings, or ruins to hide their approach. Their black scales also aid V. rexes in warming up quickly in the mornings, boosting their energy levels to gain an advantage over still sluggish herbivores (despite many being warm-blooded). The extent to which Skull Island’s V. rexes had developed since the Cretaceous Tyrannosaurus is most in evidence by comparison between skulls. Developments traced through an inferred missing link species show how the skulls became more robust and heavily armored, culminating in that of the Skull Island species. V. rexes have large, broad, three-toed feet. These big feet are an adaptation that allows the heavy animals to hunt and stalk through swampier terrain than their bulk will otherwise support. Their huge jaws are among the largest of any land predator to have lived and capable of exerting astonishing pressure to splinter bone and crush limbs. Their teeth are peg-like rather than edged, for piercing and mashing. Pregnant V. rexes lay their eggs in huge mounds of collected leaf litter in secluded spots in the jungle. The natural decomposition of the detritus provides an ideal incubation for the developing embryos, freeing the mother to wander in search of food. Periodically the female will return to the nest site to urinate on the mound, the pungent scent being enough to ward off most marauders, though not all. The stealthy Adlapsusaurus seems immune to the dire warning given off by the urine. In fact it is drawn to the scent like a dinner bell and specializes in raiding nests, even those of a V. rex. It will make stealthy sorties to retrieve its prize before retreating to a hidden den to eat. V. rexes hatch unassisted as tiny near-replicas of their parents, completely capable of taking care of themselves from the moment of emergence. Hunting in the jungle undergrowth, they graduate to taking larger and larger prey as they grow, starting out with centipedes and lizards sniffed out in the leaf litter. Grouping together in small packs of similar aged individuals for protection, young V. rexes will take down larger prey together, but without any of the sophisticated coordination characteristic of Venatosaurus packs. The young tyrannosaurs will remain in these loose affiliations until the onset of puberty, when their size begins to inhibit their effectiveness as jungle predators, forcing them into the more open forests and plains of the lowlands. Until maturity, V. rexes bare strong barring, which helps camouflage them in the jungle. While still young, they are potential prey for other carnivores, so the striped green and black of their hides helps conceal them from threats as much as it assists their own hunting. While in their packs, the pugnacious juveniles take advantage of their strength of numbers to bully other carnivores off kills. On a gang of hungry, young V. rex toughs, the subtle posturing and warning hoots of a Venatosaurus pack defending a kill are lost and conflict is inevitable. Unseasoned in the art of sizing up opponents, young V. rexes often bare injuries sustained in contest with the dangerous Venatosaurus, and deaths are not unheard of when clumsy challenges over food go awry. Scenting Venatosaurus chicks in a nest, a gang of premature V. rexes might also attempt to bully a lone sentinel off guard duty to get to the chicks, only to be surprised by the rest of the pack returning in response to the guard’s alarm calls. The black jungle is an unforgiving school for young carnivores and attention among the students is fierce. Only the quick learners survive to graduate as adults.
  • Indominus - The hybrid could run up to speeds of 30 mph when confined in its paddock with its roar alone reaching 140db-160db, as loud as the liftoff and landing of a Boeing 747 airplane. Indominus rex had spiky osteoderms across its body and horns above its eye orbits, traits that originated from the DNA of various abelisaurs used in its creation. Its osteoderms were extremely tough, being able to withstand fire from a GE M134 Minigun and even an indirect hit from an AT4 rocket launcher. It also had well-developed forelimbs from Therizinosaurus complete with opposable thumbs and a giant sickle claw on each middle finger that I. rex used to grab prey. Its long arms also allowed it to become semi-quadrupedal. A single swipe of its claws was able to incapacitate, and several were able to kill even giant sauropods like Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, Brontosaurus, and other sauropod species. It was able to change color from the cuttlefish used in its creation, which was used as camouflage in hunting, but also helped the hybrid grow at a quick rate. Their base skin color was a grayish white with eyes whose sclera were red-orange. The teeth of Indominus was tyrannosaurid which must have came from its base genome T. rex and were exposed like a crocodile. Due to this bit of instability, its teeth varied in size, often jutting out at unnatural angles and many were broken. Indominus rex had a total of 74 teeth. The Indominus' lower jaw was slightly longer than the upper jaw, which gave it something of an underbite. Another trait that came from Tyrannosaurus being in its gene pool, the hybrid inherited the massively strong bite force it had, which Indominus could use to even crush a bullet-proof Gyrosphere or break the neck of an Ankylosaurus. Its large size is attributed to Giganotosaurus. Interestingly, I. rex could reach 50 ft as an adult when none of the theropods, including Giganotosaurus, used in its creation could reach this length. The cause of this surpassed length in the hybrid is unknown. The tree frog DNA, which was intended to help them adapt to the climate of Isla Nublar, had allowed it to remove its own thermal signature. The hybrid could also detect the thermal signatures of others as well due to the pit adder DNA. The snake DNA may also be the reason why it could open its jaws wider than any of InGen's cloned theropods. Finally, the Velociraptor DNA used in Indominus creation gave it a high level of intelligence as well as the ability to communicate with Velociraptor individuals. Good examples of its intelligence being one's plan of making everyone think she escaped and her ability to remember when and where they inserted her tracking implant. Though they do hunt for food, one known I. rex was shown to kill mainly for sport. This individual also was known to have committed cannibalism, as she killed and ate her own sibling, which was the first thing she did as soon as she hatched. However, since the I. rex who had exhibited these traits had a rough upbringing these behaviors may not be natural. The cannibalism could have came from either Majungasaurus DNA or T. rex DNA or both since both theropods have fossil evidence of cannibalism, though the rough upbringing suggests that it could be a mental illness of some sort seen in this individual.
  • Deinoliopleurodon - Borderline madness. They have osteoderms that is so hard. It can withstand 2 bombs and survive skull island water terrors. 500 tons and hunt with 8 other deinoliopleurodon. They have extremely good senses
  • Shin gojira - 1100 tons and still has the atomic breath. It is the largest reptile carnivore of Skull Island, can take on giant sauropods and other giant species (Mostly whales)
  • Varanus Deinus - With new invasive species. 10 tons. These varanids can take on literally EVERY LAND ANIMAL. With venom enough to take down brontosaurus In 10 minutes. They usually hunt skull island giant mammoths. Have great senses.
  • Giant snapper - Basically a spike (It skin is basically full of spikes) turtle. It can snap trees no problem. Because of skull island water terrors evolution went rampant. A Macropredator. 12 tons. Waits for hadrosaurs. is immune to skull island water terrors. it also has 6 foot claws
  • Olurnosaurus - Descended from escaped Iguanodon that lives in Skull Island. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Raptorosaurus - Descended from Allosaurus that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to (but a lot smaller, about 15 feet long and 0.8 tons, skinnier, faster, and more agile than) their ancestors.
  • Scimitodon - Scimitodon sagax. Shrewd Scimitar-teeth, 16-19 feet long. An agile arboreal predator, Scimitodon preyed on birds and lizards, both on the ground and in the trees. Solitary hunters, except when mated, Scimitodons were surprisingly agile for their size and could take down even some of the fastest birds that made the jungles their homes. Scimitodons were incredible leapers. They could cover as much as 20 feet with a single jump. Bounding from one branch to another, they could sometimes cover several miles without touching the ground. Scimitodons had long, curved claws but used them mostly for climbing, preferring to employ their daggerlike teeth when subduing prey. Usually a single bite was enough to impact a killing wound. Females laid their eggs in clutches of two or three inside a hollow tree or in a cave beneath roots. Staying with the eggs, she incubated them and reared the pups while the male hunted and returned with food for her and the young. Young were born with short teeth, able to chew the small morsels of meat their mother would slice off for them. Their full sabers didn't grow until they were a month old. Once the pups were around 4 months old, the father would abandon his mate to return to a solitary existence. The young remained with their mother, learning from her as she hunted, until the following breeding season when she would drive them away and seek out a new mate.
  • Ambulaquasaurus - Ambulaquasaurus cristarufus, meaning "Red-crest Water-walk-lizard", is a species of dinosaur that is found on Skull Island. Ranging in length from 10-14 feet long and weights 200kg, 5 feet at the hip, Ambulaquasaurus looks a lot like Peracerdon, except it has a heavier body. The head is long and narrow, the forearms have large claws, and the long tail is used for balance. Along the spine are a series of reddish fins. Ambulaquasaurus is a greenish blue bipedal theropod of about 10–14 feet (3 to 3.9 meters) long. It is lightly built, which betrays its dromaeosaur ancestry. The skull is markedly different from its ancestors and appears to have adapted for catching fish; the jaws are long and practically toothless except for forward-facing, needle-like teeth placed at the front of the mouth. These are ideal for catching fish and resemble those of the fish-eating gharial from Asia. Ambulaquasaurus also has several thin, orange crests on its skull and back, which look slightly similar to the dorsal fins of some fish, although their function is unknown; they might play a role in mating rituals or communication. Ambulaquasaurus is the freshwater waterway analog to Peracerdon. A large wading dinosaur, Ambulaquasaurus wades out into fast-moving streams and rivers to snatch fish up to three feet in length. They are found all over Skull Island, with a habitat ranging from coastal marshes, to rivers, to tiny side-streams. Rapids are a favorite spot for Ambulaquasaurus, and they will gather there in time for migratory runs, each Ambulaquasaurus taking up a favored spot. Arguments over who gets what spot are quickly resolved with growls and displays of their reddish dorsal crests.Though related to the vicious hunter Venatosaurus saevidicus, Ambulaquasaurus is a less threatening fish eater.A dedicated fish eater, Ambulaquasaurus was a slender theropod related to the Venatosaurus species. With long limbs and an elongated, needle-toothed snout, the predator ideally suited to life as a fisher. Strong enough to resist most rivers, Ambulaquasaurus will wade out into a rushing river, using overhanging vegetation, cliffs, and polarized membranes over the eyes to cut down on surface glare, allowing them to find and snap up fish of all sizes.Specialized eyes minimized the effect of glare on the water. Cunningly, they chose hunting spots that were shaded by cliffs or overhanging vegetation to further cut down reflections that might impede their ability to spot fish below the surface. Adapted to pin slippery, fast-moving fish, the jaws were similar to the crocodilian gharial of Asia. Even fish almost 3 feet were no match for the bite of Ambulaquasaurus, with its lighting reflexes and eyesight every bit as keen as the edge on its teeth. The World Of Kong Book gives it 1/2 running, and 8/16 swimming. Its scaled skin gives it damage resistance. Ambulaquasaurus are nevertheless powerful enough to hunt in deeper, faster-flowing rivers where the current is too strong for smaller fish eaters. They often pick shadowy spots (under cliffs, for instance) which reduce the amount of reflected sunlight on the water surface. Their eyes are also adapted to minimize the glare's effect on the accuracy of their vision. Ambulaquasaurus has also learned the timing of the migration of the Sparkleside fish. When these fish travel from the estuaries near Skull Island's shores to the inland pools where they spawn, several Ambulaquasaurus will certainly be following their path. The Ambulaquasaurus usually prefer large fish, but sometimes they catch large batches of smaller fish. The largest of the wading dinosaurs, Ambulaquasaurus's were strong enough to be able to wade deep into fast-moving water to snap up prey that other fishers were either too small to subdue or found it too difficult to reach. They hunted throughout the island, from the coastal marsh, up the fast-flowing rivers, and into the tiny tributary streams. A particular specialty of the species was waiting next to rapids to snap up the Skull Island freshwater mullet species Micocallum, or Sparklesides, as they made their way up and down the river. Living in the estuary most of the year, Sparklesides spawned in inland pools, forcing them to make the perilous journey upstream and back every breeding season. Ambulaquasaurus's timed their arrival at the rapids to be ready and waiting when the first fish headed upriver, each dinosaur taking up position in a traditional spot. Displays and growls were usually enough to sort out issues of dominance and fights over prime fishing sites quickly, permitting all concerned to concentrate on the business of catching fish.
  • Peracerdon - Long and lean, Peracerdon is a bipedal predator of fish, seabirds, eggs, crustaceans, and even seal pups (if it gets the chance). A theropod, Peracerdon is found all along the perimeter of Skull Island, from the rocky coasts to sedate swamps. Powerful claws keep Peracerdon anchored in even the roughest of waves, allowing it to remain steady in pounding surf. It usually remains still, darting its head down to snatch up prey items. Anywhere from 12 to 16 feet long, Peracerdon is mostly long, narrow head, and whip-like tail (used for balance). Greenish, it has red finlike projections running down its back. It weights 200kg.
  • Arsarticaedes - Arsasrtis is descended from theropod dinosaurs, which in the process of evolution back to a four-legged animal. It is a slender, agile predator. It has a compact skull, four skinny legs. It reaches from 2.6 to 4 meters long and about a meter high at the hip.
  • Deinoraptosaurus - Descended from dromaeosaurs (either Dakotaraptor or Utahraptor) that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores like their ancestors. But unlike their ancestors, they are no longer bidpedal, they became fully quadrupedal predators that are more powerful and slower than their ancestors. They are more of a scavenger than predator.
  • Skull Island Diplodocus - Descended from diplodocuses that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Gourmand - Descended from gourmands that escaped from universal zoos. They are carnivores. Thsey are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Bricket - Descended from brickets that escaped from universal zoos. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Venatosaurus - Venatosaurus saevidicus, is a large, powerful dromaeosaur from the jungles and open spaces of Skull Island. It measures 16-24 feet long. Skull Island’s pack-hunting Venatosaurus dromaeosaurs take the advances and specializations of their Cretaceous forbearers and develop them to a new extreme. Their keen eyesight, great speed, and sickle-shaped second toe claws they share with their cousins, but Venatosaurus have taken these adaptations and added a few more to make them even more effective killers. Lumbering V. rexes thunder about Skull Island as brutish analogous relics of their long-lost kin. By contrast, the Venatosaurus are a new breed of hunter, the likes of which had only begun to appear in the Late Cretaceous. With 66 million years of evolution behind them, these new predators have time to sharpen their killing tools to an unparalleled edge. Mobile hips allow the legs to swivel out farther from the body than any other dromaeosaur. While this flexibility is a tradeoff that lowers the animals’ top speed, it affords Venatosaurus vastly superior agility and flexibility (traits more valuable than a winning straight-line sprint in the labyrinth jungle). Their nimble hip joints permit them to crouch at ground level, their stomachs touching the ground, yet still be poised to pounce at a moment’s notice. This adaptation permits the large hunters to make use of surprisingly low cover when preparing an ambush. The eyes are positioned high on the head, allowing a Venatosaurus to peer over cover while still remaining almost completely hidden from potential prey like a tree-tops. The pupils are catlike, slit and able to dilate to let in more light when hunting in the unbroken shade beneath the great trees. The ribcage of a Venatosaurus is reduced in length, but deepens, granting more flexibility at the waist with no reduction in lung capacity (a trait more commonly found in mammals). The deeper profile wields more muscle attachment, increasing strength to the arms and a more powerful grip on struggling prey. Venatosaurus are found throughout the heavily forested regions of Skull Island. They prefer the dense jungle to the open stretches because it affords them more cover during hunts and ample concealment for their own nests and young. Packs with territory bordering the forest edge will sometimes make sorties into the open lands to hunt, but usually only under the cover of darkness. Diurnal V. rexes will kill a Venatosaurus if they are ever to catch one. However, by sticking to the jungle, the smaller predators avoid competition and danger. Venatosaurus are intelligent and social hunters, living in small packs of 6-12 adults with their young. Coordinating their hunting sorties with impressive cunning, packs have developed specific techniques for tackling potentially dangerous prey animals at minimum risk. Venatosaurus is the only predator species that actively preys on adult Brontosaurus. No other predator on the island, including the mighty V. rexes, can match the size of the prey they bring down. Packs split, certain members strategically revealing themselves to panic and stampede a Brontosaurus herd in a predetermined direction. Flankers take up the chase, molesting the giants onto a course they have selected; across dangerously broken ground, over bluffs, or into dead ends. Injury or death among the herd lays meat upon the Venatosaurus’ table, rewarding their cunning with rich bounties of carcasses large enough to feed a pack for a week or more. In addition to the giant Brontosaurus, almost any midsized or large jungle herbivore might find itself on their menu, including any of the ceratopsians and the blade-backed Asperdorsus. A brave Venatosaurus might even occasionally try its luck with a diablosaurus. Their strong social structure is key to Venatosaurus’ success. Meaningful communications between individuals allow for the level of coordination employed in their hunts, but also minimize inefficient competition and conflict within the pack. An alpha breeding pair dominates the pack, but breeding is not restricted to them. Chicks born into the strict hierarchy inherit the rank of their parents. Venatosaurus chicks are born live and are cared for by the whole pack. Food is brought to them in their excavated nest, usually under the roots of a large tree, until they are old and strong enough to follow the pack on a hunt. At all times the young are guarded by a low-ranking escort. This sentry will remain at the nest site when the rest of the pack hunts. A single Venatosaurus pack ranges over a large territory with well-defined borders. Tree scraping a regular marking with feces or urine reinforces these borders with rival packs. Where territory is contested, posturing and noisy displays are usually enough to defuse tensions and resolve the matter. Rarely does a border dispute turn violent. A regular on the menu for Venatosaurus, and a most curious member of the Skull Island menagerie, is the Skull Island gaur. While in their packs, pugnacious juvenile v. rexes take advantage of their strength of numbers to bully other carnivores off kills. On a gang of hungry, young V. rex toughs, the subtle posturing and warning hoots of a Venatosaurus pack defending a kill are lost and conflict is inevitable. Unseasoned in the art of sizing up opponents, young V. Rexes often bare injuries sustained in contest with the dangerous Venatosaurus, and deaths are not unheard of when clumsy challenges over food go awry. Scenting Venatosaurus chicks in a nest, a gang of premature V. rexes might also attempt to bully a lone sentinel off guard duty to get to the chicks, only to be surprised by the rest of the pack returning in response to the guard’s alarm calls. The black jungle is an unforgiving school for young carnivores and attention among the students is fierce. Only the quick learners survive to graduate as adults. Venatosaurus are lean killing machines with bodies built to combine speed, power, and agility. Their bones are slim and hollow to cut down on superfluous weight, but honeycombed to keep them strong and durable. Their heads are tapered and narrow, rowed with slender teeth, edged like razors but rigid and tough for thrusting into thick herbivore hides. As if one variety of lethal Venatosaurus is not enough, Skull Island is home to a second, closely related species, Venatosaurus impavidus. Smaller than Venatosaurus saevidicus, Venatosaurus impavidus is no less impressive a predator. Distinguished by their striped brown coloring and blue-tipped tails, these lithe hunters tend to favor the dark valleys and ravines, often hunting along the river ways, where Skull Island gaurs and Ligocristus are concentrated. At half the weight of the bigger V. saevidicus, V. impavidus is also able to use arboreal routes, springing silently along overhanging, mossy boughs and logs, when sneaking up on prey. Better lowlight vision makes them effective twilight hunters, using the changing light to catch prey at their most vulnerable, either taking daylight herbivores as the light fails or savaging nocturnal prey still at a disadvantage in the half-light. Their bright blue tails are used in sexual displays. More vividly colored individuals seem to be most sought after as mate. Venatosaurus have nimble fingers and remarkable dexterity with their grasping front claws. Unique among dinosaurs, they use their hands to manipulate their environment to their advantage. When crouching behind cover, Venatosaurus will reposition the obscuring Vegetation to better hide themselves and create openings through which to spy. During courtship, females signal their interest or indifference through sinuous raised tail waving or dropping and facing away. Males announce their affection by strutting with hands clasped at the chest and high tail-flicking. Aggressive displays toward rival Venatosaurus or other threats are usually accompanied by screeching and ground-scraping. Displaying Venatosaurus will hold their tails high and rigid, their front claws extended and flexing while they ruck up the earth around them with their long, curved toe claws. Similar to the threat dance is the dominance pose. Screeching or scraping will follow; should the correct submissive response not be forthcoming. Submissive individuals crouch, their heads bowed and their tails dropped. The front claws are held close to the body in a nonthreatening manner.
  • Udusaurus - Udusaur (Udusaurus turpis, meaning Ugly Wet-lizard) measures 4-6 feet in length. An aquatic reptile from the same family as the sinuous Turturcassis, the Udusaurus is a compact, bullet-headed carnivore that hunts the rivers of Skull Island in packs of half a dozen. Air breathers, Udusauruses could dive for up to three minutes, herding schools of their preferred prey - small fish - into cul-de-sacs or close to the surface where they could be cornered. Individuals took turns surging into the cluster to grab mouthfuls of fish.
  • Turturcassis - Turturcassis. Turtle-helmet, 8-13 feet long The long reptilian predator Turturcassis, with its long neck and sinuous build, was a lithe hunter of the flooded forests and deeper rivers, where it preyed upon fish and turtles. Turturcassis had a unique trick for dealing with the turtles that made the bulk of its diet. Retreating into their shells afforded no protection to the armoured turtles. The relentless Turturcassis could plunge its long, tubular head into the head or limb openings of the shell, literally devouring the turtle from the inside out, leaving an empty husk of carapace behind. Among the turtle species upon which Turturcassis fed was the loggerhead, a species of ocean-roaming sea turtle. Skull Island had its own population of the turtles living in the wider stretches of it primary river. Unlike their pelagic cousins, these turtles lived entirely in the freshwater river. They appeared to be a recent addition to the island's menagerie, not yet distinct enough to warrant a subspecies classification.
  • Megalosuchus - This monster raisuchian weighs 10 tons and 14 meters. Another one of the new but native wildlife. Can track prey all over skull island
  • Diablosuchus - Until recently. All of skull islands crocs are inland. Diablosuchus is the largest skull island croc and 50 feet-62 feet
  • Dragonskin - Dragonskins were striking monitor lizards that recently colonized the island but had evolved into a new species. Having likely arrived on rafts of vegetation or driftwood from somewhere in Southeast Asia, they developed brilliant red scales that were even more vivid in the breeding season. The precise function of the markings is not clear, though it may have been to startle predators. Both sexes were brighly colored. Dragonskins fed on eggs and small creatures they found along the rocky shore and on the cliffs they nimbly climbed. 7 feet long.
  • Piranha-Mouth - Descended from Simosuchus that rafted to Skull Island from California. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but they are much bigger (about 24 feet long) and now has piranha-like mouths (hence their name) as a defence against their new predators.
  • Skull Island Godzilla - Descended from 2014 godzillas that live in Skull Island. They are a lot smaller (about 10 feet long and 2,000 pounds) than their massive ancestors. They no longer have atomic breath, but they still have glowing spikes to attract their mates.
  • Skull Island Gamera - Descended from gameras that live in Skull Island. They are a lot smaller (about 12 feet long and 2,500 pounds) than their ancestors. They now longer have hovering abilities or atomic abilities, but can stil swim very well and walk on land.
  • Diablosaurus - It is a strange, medium-sized, short-necked, rhino-like titanosaur from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 20-25 feet long. With their crusty, armored backs and thick hides, the imposing Diablosaurus have few enemies. Their size and indifference to attack, thanks to their armor, assures them of safety once fully-grown. Only the young are vulnerable to predation by midsized to large predators (like Venatosaurus and Carvers) and, for this reason, they are closely guarded by the adults. Young are born live and grow in the protection of their familial group until old enough to strike out on their own in search of a mate. Being seldom molested by predators, Diablosaurus usually associate in only small numbers, either immediate family units or mated pairs. Solitary individuals, particularly males, are not uncommon. Male Diablosaurus have some of the largest horns, though they are present in females as well. The exact configuration of horns and osteoderms seems to vary widely between individuals and may serve some rudimentary identification process. Both males and females have garish, ruddy heads. Conspicuous amid the dark foliage, they assist individuals in finding one another in the lowlight of the deep jungle. The markings also aid in intimidating would-be predators. Diablosaurus have poor vision, primarily relying on smell to find food. Their mammal-like, mobile lips and flat, grinding teeth are adapted to shred and crush the tough ferns that cover the jungle floor. They also use their great strength to strip particular vine species that they favor, tearing the creepers free with mighty tugs of their great heads. In overall body shape Diablosaurus resemble ceratopsians, but instead of being part, or even close relatives, of Skull Island’s several ceratopsian species, Diablosaurus represent an unconventional offshoot of the sauropod lineage. With truncated necks and stubby tails, they have evolved new armor plating and a stocky physique instead of the elongated necks and tails that are the line’s most famous features.
  • Brontosaurus - Brontosaurus baxteri, is an enormous apatosaurine diplodocid from Skull Island that is easily the largest animal on the island. It measures 80-120 feet long. The largest animals on Skull Island, the mighty Brontosaurus are capable of reaching lengths of well over 100 feet. Their long necks allow these sauropods to browse foliage as high as 20 feet above of the ground and their massive bulk places full-grown Brontosaurus well outside the weight class of almost all of the island’s predators. Though superficially similar to their extinct prehistoric ancestors, the Brontosaurus of Skull Island have developed several distinct features that allow them to flourish. Unlike sauropods of the Mesozoic era (as well as most other dinosaurs in general), they are viviparous, giving birth between one and three live young at a time. The major physiological development is in response to the constraints of island living. A slower reproduction rate keeps the population in balance with the smaller habitat and fewer resources. Live born young, able to walk within hours of birth, reduce juvenile mortality thanks to the security afforded to them by being able to move within the safety of the herd. Young are cared for and protected by all other members of the herd, which can number between 6 and 20 individuals. Regardless of their parenthood, all members of the herd will share duties of protecting young from predators. As they mature, young females will leave to join other herds, while young males stay with the group to assist in defense. The sheer size of the adults protects them from almost all of the island’s predators, but young are at risk from V. rexes and other large carnivores. With a single adult male leading each herd, younger males are inhibited from achieving full maturity by pheromones exuded by the lead male, ensuring he fathers all the herd’s offspring. Immature males, rarely achieving even the size of mature females, are therefore more likely targets for marauding V. rexes, effectively decoys for breeding stock of the herd. Brontosaurus is the tallest herbivore on the island, browsing on the highest of branches at 55 feet above the ground, while the Ligocristus and other midsized herbivores browse on smaller trees that are typically 25 feet above the ground. Ceratopsians (namely Ferrucutus) feed on the low shrubs, ferns, and grasses that grow 4.5 feet tall or shorter, and smaller plant-eaters (like Pugiodorsus and certain flightless birds) feed around them at ground level (or at 10 feet above the ground); thus each herbivore species avoids competing with each other for food. When the herd is separated during feeding, Brontosaurus communicate with one another by stomping signals that are transmitted through the ground over short distances and received by other members of the herd through the pads of their feet. Simple alarms can be easily transmitted by individuals feeding on the outskirts of the family group, alerting the entire herd to any danger. Apart from their size, the primary defense mechanism of a Brontosaurus is its strong tail. When threatened, a well-aimed swipe can wind or even injure an unwary predator. The towering herbivores are also responsible for clearing old and new areas of forest growth in their quest for the most digestible food sources. Moving through the jungle between the open lands, families of Brontosaurus create game trails, clearing paths through the thick forest with their great strength. Sturdy skeletons support the great hulk of the Brontosaurus. Stocky legs with incredibly dense limb bones support the creature’s mass. Capable of running only for short bursts when threatened, they are not built for sprinting and, being so heavy, will tire quickly. The teeth are short and stubby, designed for tearing off pieces of vegetation. Stones in the gizzard aid digestion of foliage that is bulk-loaded and swallowed without being chewed. Venatosaurus is the only predator species that actively preys on adult Brontosaurus. No other predator on the island, including the mighty V. rexes, can match the size of the prey they bring down. Packs split, certain members strategically revealing themselves to panic and stampede a Brontosaurus herd in a predetermined direction. Flankers take up the chase, molesting the giants onto a course they have selected; across dangerously broken ground, over bluffs, or into dead ends. Injury or death among the herd lays meat upon the Venatosaurus’ table, rewarding their cunning with rich bounties of carcasses large enough to feed a pack for a week or more. The crumbling pre-native ruins dotting Skull Island create unusual landscapes that Venatosaurus learn to use to their benefit. Calculating intellect is perhaps the genus’s most lethal weapon, surpassing even their teeth and claws. Herding prey down what must once have been streets and into cul-de-sac courtyards, hunting packs make use of the alleyways and channels between buildings to afford them ambush sites and parallel paths to outrun and outflank intended victims once a chase has begun. These tactics require fewer hunters to accomplish the same job. Broken ground and gulches created by the ruins make effective traps for Venatosaurus to drive prey into for slaughter.
  • Nefundusaurus - Stalking the shoreline of Skull Island was a brutish four-legged heavyweight (Also note it weighs 800 Kilograms and 16-24 feet) with a taste for flesh. This heavy-bodied animal isn't a dinosaur, but a member of the archosaur family, a group that predates the dinosaurs. A virtual eating machine, Nefundusaurus isn't picky about its meals, and uses it excellent sense of smell to track down carrion of all sorts, although it isn't afraid to devour shellfish, turtles, seals, and anything else it can sink its teeth into -- including Skull Island's human inhabitants. Its huge olfactory canal afforded the animal an acute sense of smell. The majority of its diet was decaying fish or other tide-stranded carrion, which the Nefundusaurus was led to by ribbons of rot wafting to its nostrils on the breeze. Nefundusaurus used its size to also steal meals from smaller carnivores, including the coastal crocodilian Dirusuchus (Dire-crocodile), though intimidation and brute force. With powerful jaws, they were capable of wolfing down carcasses whole. Even robust shellfish and turtes could be cracked and swallowed, digested later in the reptile's incredibly acidic stomach. Live prey was taken when it could be caught. Fat-rich seals were ambushed from behind cover on the rocky shore.
  • Avarusaurus - Avarusaurus populator, is a medium-sized, partly quadrupedal, omnivorous spinosaur from the jungles of Skull Island, similar in it lifestyle to a large ground sloth. It measures 18-26 feet long. An Avarusaurus is a surly opportunist that eats everything from carrion to fungi, live prey to rotten fruit. An intensely acidic stomach allows the big omnivore to bulk-load whatever food it comes across for digestion later. The semi-quadrupedal Avarusaurus is solitary, but its tenacity and strength keep it safe from most other predators, like Dinocanisaurus.
  • Calcarisaurus - The Moloch-like Calcarisaurus was a small, thorny reptile with a near impregnable hide. Despite its small size, few predators bothered the plucky little tank out of respect for its battery of spurs, which covered almost every surface of its body. A secreted irritant along the edges of Calcarisaurus' spurs helped to drive home its message of inedibility to the curious or stupid. Such a solid defense granted Calcarisaurus impunity to wander the island without fear of molestation by carnivores. As a result, its eyesight and hearing were poor, having little need for those senses to alert it to danger. Smell was Calcarisuarus' principal sense and it was used to track down small lizards, rodents, and large invertebrates in the scrub and open regions. Centipedes were a particularly favored prey and were excavated from their burrows by Calcarisaurus with its strong digging claws. The bites of the large Skull Island centipedes did not worry the animal. One predator alone was a threat to Calcarisaurus. Venatosaurus, intelligent and adaptable, had developed strategies for flipping its prey to expose the vulnerable, less heavily armored underside, restricting Calcarisaurus to regions where the predators seldom roamed.
  • Discus - Discus is a species of flying lizard that made its home on the rocky shore. Pretty green-and-yellow lizards, they took their name from their round wings. These enabled them to make short, quick flights between rocks in pursuit of insects, and to avoid the gulls that preyed on them.
  • Ligocristus - Ligocristus innocens, is a common, sociable lambeosaurine hadrosaur from the lowlands of Skull Island. It measures 26-34 feet long. The most numerous large herbivores on Skull Island, Ligocristus congregates in herds numbering several dozen individuals. Ligocristus are hadrosaur ornithischians, with broad, three-toed feet and distinctive wide, duck-like snouts. With no other defenses, safety is found in numbers, where many eyes improve the chances of predators being spotted. Being strong swimmers, Ligocristus are also among the only native herbivores that will readily take to the water to escape land-based threats. Nonetheless, they are the staple prey species for many different predatory creatures from V. rexes to Venatosaurus and phorusrhacid species. Mottled markings camouflage the Ligocristus when in the dappled light of the forest or the deeper jungle. In the open their patterning helps break up their outlines. Being more shore-footed and agile than the great lumbering sauropods, Ligocristus are able to move with greater ease through the many different vegetation zones on the island, granting them access to a wide range of food sources. All-purpose feeders, they eat a variety of vegetation: grasses, leaves, water weeds, roots, and even bark. Ligocristus are highly vocal animals (typical for lambeosaurines). The valleys echo constantly with their trumpet-like vocalizations as they call to one another to maintain herd cohesiveness while moving through the dense and obscuring jungle, and to reassure one another of safety when feeding in the open. Their vocabulary is surprisingly large, with a range of calls for different purposes. Soft rumbles made while eating signal the availability of different foods to each other and complex grunts are used to communicate social messages of dominance and mood between individuals. Sporting prominent bony crests with long trailing flaps of skins, Ligocristus are able to communicate mood and breeding status visually. In a mechanism similar to that of a chameleon, chromatophores in a Ligocristus crest skin flap can flush to create different hues on the skin as a result of hormonal signals. In the breeding season, males will signal dominance and sexual maturity with deep vermilion crest displays and bellows. Males excavate performance scratches in the earth and compete for female attention with posturing and loud calls. Territorial sparring matches over the best display positions are common. In the breeding season, exhausted competitors make easy pickings for wise predators. Ligocristus skulls include several specialized features supporting their lifestyle. Highly vocal, they have enlarged resonating chambers in their skulls and crests, through which they are able to trumpet loud calls to one another. Their broad snouts widen into hard, flat beaks, ideal for plucking and grinding a wide range of vegetation. Powerful muscles drive their strong jaws, which lack front teeth but are lined with low, hard molars at the back. Vegetable matter mashed between horny plates of the beak is passed back to be thoroughly pulverized and pulped before swallowing. A distinctive side-to-side chewing motion and the ability to store food in the cheeks lends these dinosaurs a distinctly cattle-like countenance as they quietly feed, perpetually chewing on their end. As the main course of many of the island’s predators, Ligocristus are forced to maintain a constant lookout for danger. Eyes are positioned high on the head and angled outward to take in an almost 360-degree view. The pupils are horizontally slotted to concentrate vision along the horizon line. At their most vulnerable during low feeding, when their heads are down, their eyes are able to swivel, maintaining a horizontal bias regardless of the snout’s angle. Seeking to avoid predators and egg thieves, some Ligocristus mothers choose to nest on small islets and sandbars in the swamps that are exposed during the driest months. Away from predatory eyes, the nests are less likely to be raided. Few of Skull Island’s land-based predators are inclined to swim, and the river’s own resident carnivores are mostly water-bound. Left to develop on their own, the small clutches of eggs will hatch in synchronized batches to maximize the chances of survival for the young. Calls of the hatchlings draw their parents back to the islands, where they will stay for several days until the young are strong enough to risk leaving the safety of the sanctuaries. For adults, the short swim across a river or through marshlands is no great hardship. For new hatchlings, however, this trip can be perilous. Several species of water predators (such as Inoxes, udusaurs, Skull Island snappers and Turturcassis) make it their business to be waiting nearby when the adult Ligocristus return to guide their young back to land again after hatching.
  • Ferrucutus - Ferrucutus cerastes, is a large, powerful, competitive centrosaurine ceratopsid from the lowlands of Skull Island. It measures 24-34 feet long. Among the most impressive herbivores on Skull Island are the mighty Ferrucutus. Heavily built grazers/browsers with massive shoulders and enormous frills of bone and spike, these powerful animals are dangerous prey for the island’s carnivores. Despite their fearsome aspect and aggressive manner, Ferrucutus are exclusively herbivores, eating low shrubbery and using their nasal horns to uproot tall cycads to get to the fruit in the crown of the plants. Jungle cleared by Brontosaurus herds is quickly reduced to grassland by these shrub-browsing ceratopsids, their hard beaks making short work of the thorns and woody stems. Ferrucutus herds can number up to around 12 individuals. Herds claim and defend small territories where eggs are laid, giving them time to develop in safety. Young immediately join the herd upon hatching and gain the protection of the group. When threatened by a predator, the herd instinctively closes around the young, presenting a ring of outward-facing horns and frills while the dominant male will then rush forward to challenge the intruder. Even the biggest and hungriest V. rex will think twice about tackling an enraged bull Ferrucutus. Certainly a threat to would-be predators, the head armament of a Ferrucutus is primarily used in dominance fights between adult males contesting lordship of their small herds of females and young. Intensely territorial and pugnacious, adult bulls can grow to almost half again as large as a cow. They collect small harems and guard them jealously. Fights between males are frequent. Young bulls congregate in bachelor herds, honing their sparring skills with playful bouts until they are large and strong enough to challenge for their own harems. Full dominance fights can be bloody, with injury not uncommon and death not unheard of. Even superficially wounded bulls can die of nasty infections later. “The larger the frill, the more senior the animal” seems to be the rule among the ceratopsians of Skull Island, especially with Ferrucutus. Starting out small in juveniles, the frills of the Ferrucutus grow throughout their lives, with the older individuals sporting huge and elaborate horned frills. Adult females have large frills and horns, but by far the most impressive arrays are those of the big adult males. Some bulls have horns over six feet long. In mature individuals, the face of the frill above the brows will change color in the breeding season to indicate readiness to mate. In some cases this display is enough to intimidate a competitor into giving up before any violence occurs. Among females, the secondary cheek horns are barely noticeable and the small horns at the center top of the frill rarely grow long enough to cross. Only the largest males develop a full crossover, and this is good measure of the age of the individual. With powerfully muscles shoulders and huge, heavy skulls, the skeletons of Ferrucutus are heavily reinforced. Huge forelimbs give them traction in head sparring and in uprooting stubborn plants. The neck is built to transmit impact from the skull and spreads it throughout the body, diffusing jolts as males fight. All the limbs are drawn directly under the body to support the animals’ sturdy physique. Vertebrates like Ferrucutus actively provoke the Skull Island termites to swarm over their hides by rubbing themselves against mounds. While their own skins are tough enough to withstand the termites’ bites, unwelcome dermal parasites on the hides are not so lucky.
  • Tree-Tops - Sylvaceratops, is a swift, jungle-dwelling ceratopsoid from Skull Island. It measures 12-16 feet long. Deep in the steamy jungle, a bizarre member of the ceratopsian suborder has adapted to life amid the tangled trunks. Where the lowland plains’ bulky Ferrucutus bares the build of a heavyweight boxer, the graceful tree-tops has a dancer’s physique. Tall and lithe, they are narrow through the body to allow them to slip easily through the dense maze of trunks, their long frills lying flat along their necks as they press through thick vegetation. When threatened, tree-tops will rely on speed and agility to escape. Only during the nesting season will bulls and cows stand their ground, lowering their shield-like faces to the ground to form a wall of bone and horn between their vulnerable eggs and would-be predators like Venatosaurus and Foetodon. Like Ferrucutus, tree-tops travel in small familial herds. Males compete for access to females but become territorial only during the breeding season, permitting several other adult males to coexist in harmony within the same herd for most of the year. Adult males’ frills become elaborately colored during the breeding season, with the most brilliant attracting a large harem of females. Small occipital horns also sprout seasonally and are used in jousting fights between the bulls to assert dominance. The curving brow horns allow the competing bulls to grapple, the winner bringing an opponent to the ground in contests that are as much of balance as of brute strength. Occipital horns are shed later, minimizing the chance of snags or entanglement. Tree-tops subsist on shrubs and undergrowth, supplementing their diet with seasonal fruit and nuts fallen from the canopy. At certain times of the year the genus will demonstrate uncanny intuition, waiting below a particular tree the very day the fruit begins to fall. Long legs give tree-tops excellent speed and agility. With three strong toes on each foot, which bare resemblance to mammalian hooves, these rather beautiful genasaurs have excellent grip and balance. The nimble tree-tops can jink and spring to avoid attack, cutting a zigzagging trail through the dense trees and vines that few predators can match. Most small to midsized herbivorous inhabitants of the jungle are potential Carver prey, but they commonly take young tree-tops. The agile ceratopsians are faster through the dense jungle, so the almost felid-like Carvers take advantage of overhanging boughs or fallen trees to approach hidden from above, remaining concealed until within pouncing range.
  • Asperdorsus - Asperdorsus bellator, an armored, spiked diplodocoid from the jungles of Skull. It measures 36-42 feet long. Second only to Brontosaurus in size are the giant Asperdorsus, narrow-bodied, long-necked, armored sauropods of the deep jungle. Cousins of the more heavily built Brontosaurus, they are tall and limber-necked. Sticking to the thick, wooded regions, Asperdorsus are browsers of midlevel foliage that is out of reach for most other terrestrial plant-eaters of the jungle. Their narrow draft allows these giants to maneuver adeptly between the twisted and densely packed trees, despite their great size. Asperdorsus have an excellent sense of smell, guiding them to their favored food in the relentless dark beneath the jungle canopy. Their small heads are tooled with snipping and grinding teeth. The Asperdorsus has a fondness for several small fruits that ripen at different times of the year, so their slow and meandering migration through the forest follows an annual rhythm as dictated by fruiting times. Hard osteoderms stud an Asperdorsus’s rough hides, and their rigid dorsal spines are hard enough to impale clumsy enemies. Thick armor and their sheer mass puts them out of the weight class of most predators, though Venatosaurus and Carvers are game. Both predators are sufficiently armed and cunning enough to try. Even these dangerous killers are wary of the long tail of an Asperdorsus, which is capable of breaking bone with a powerful enough blow. Solitary for most of the year, in the breeding season Asperdorsus locate one another with low frequency rumbles that they produce in their stomachs. Males do their best to impress females by leveling small areas of jungle, using their tails to thrash and shred underbrush Vegetation and push over small trees. In this clearing, they stamp and rumble, crashing about to make as much noise as possible. Females are drawn to the biggest and most destructive performers, seeking the strongest males to father their offspring. Less heavily built than the giant Brontosaurus, Asperdorsus have long limbs and high bellies compared to their open lowland kin. This gives them plenty of clearance when moving through thick vegetation. Narrow in cross section, they have long tails to balance their elongated necks.
  • Atercurisaurus - It is a rare, dark-colored, jungle-dwelling stegosaurine stegosaurid from Skull Island. It measures 16-20 feet long. The last of their suborder, Skull Island’s small population of surviving stegosaurs clings to existence in ferny valleys deep in the interior of the island. Impressively armored with a studded hide, tall dorsal plates, and lethal abdominal and tail spikes, Atercurisaurus is not an easy food source for predators. Small herds of around a dozen females with young are led by matriarchs, with satellite bachelor males who are never far away. In the breeding season males will take turns approaching the herd and displaying, hoping to win the approval of the matriarch and her followers. If accepted, he will be allowed to temporarily join the herd, gaining access to the females for a few short days. Atercurisaurus is a noisy species, producing a range of sounds, from low-pitched squeals and grunts to deep gizzard rumbles. Specific sounds have different meanings. Reassuring murmurs, made while eating, seem to impact an “all is well” signal to other members of the loosely dispersed herd as they feed. Begging squeaks from youngsters stimulate parents to disgorge their meals, while a similar sound produced by a low-ranking adult conveys submission before the matriarch. Several bellows, each specific to a particular threat, alerts the group to danger, the adults reacting accordingly to protect their young.
  • Aciedactylus - Aciedactylus mandocaris, is a strange allosaurid from the eastern estuary of Skull Island. It measures 12-15 feet long. Aciedactylus specializes in eating shellfish in the swampy estuaries and mangroves. Broad, splay-toed feet keep the dinosaur from sinking into the sodden mud and sand, but its most peculiar adaptation is the second pair of nostrils mounted atop its triangular nasal crests. Aciedactylus’s primary nostrils can pinch shut when exhaling, forcing air into the resonating crests and small secondary nostrils to trumpet calls to one another. The main function of these secondary nostrils becomes clear during feeding. Scaling the primaries, Aciedactylus can breathe through the high-mounted secondary nostrils while most of its head is down in the shallow water or mud of the estuary, grubbing for shellfish. Its teeth are short and thick for crushing mollusk and arthropod shells. The placid theropod instead defends itself with long bladelike claws on its fingers, flexing and brandishing them at potential threats to warn them away.
  • Chaly-Tops - Chalyceratops seradorsus, is a tough, mountain-dwelling, almost Chasmosaurus-like chasmosaurine ceratopsid from Skull Island. It measures 10-16 feet long. Grazing the borders of the jungle, where it gives way into scree and rock, the chaly-tops, a hardheaded ceratopsian, eats subalpine vegetation but avoids the thick forest. Chaly-topses are rare, but the clash of their gladiatorial contests in the breeding season rang throughout the upland regions. Males will joust and butt violently to secure a harem of females. Their fights are among the most brutal of any ceratopsian species, with frequent fatalities and injuries. Most bulls bare extensive scarring and broken or damaged horn arrays.
  • Bifurcatops - Bifurcatops peritus, is a agile, graceful, long-legged protoceratopsid from the uplands of Skull Island. It measures 6-10 feet long. The gazelle-like Bifurcatops is the smallest and most delicate of the ceratopsians of Skull Island. Its distinct, almost horseshoe-shaped frill and horn array is not robust enough for physical contests. Instead, males engage in elaborate dances, bowing and swaying before females to impress them. Fleet and nimble, they can traverse the dizzy heights of the crumbling mountains with ease and grace, eating low plants that stud the rocky slopes in herds.
  • Falcatops - It is a strange, wading, almost stork-like coelophysoid from the swampy wetlands of Skull Island. Falcatops is a wading theropod that feeds on the large carrion-eating Incultulepas whelks. The bow-shaped, almost toothless snout of the dinosaur is perfectly adapted to slide inside the shell of the mollusk, slicing the snail from the walls of its armor, intact, to swallow it whole.
  • Pugiodorsus - Pugiodorsus squameus, is a common, armor-plated basal ornithischian with long spikes on its shoulders from the jungles of Skull Island. It is a common prey for Carvers. It measures 9 feet long. Moving in small herds, Pugiodorsus rotate guard duties, with one or two keeping watch while the rest graze low plants. Alertness is their greatest defense, necessitating great stealth on the part of Carvers (and other predators like Foetodon), even at night. Their bladed shoulder spikes, backward facing to protect them from pursuing predators, forces Carvers to take care when making killing bites. A wise hunter makes sure to bite low, aiming for the stomach or neck.
  • Foetodon - Foetodon ferrus, is a large, bulky, lizard-like notosuchian from the jungles of Skull Island that relies on ambush. It measures 15-20 feet long. The giant, broad-bodied Foetodon is a surly jungle predator and scavenger, well-adapted to life prowling leaf litter-chocked forest floor. Scutes along its back betray the species common ancestry with crocodilians, but the snout is short and heavily reinforced for bone-crushing and brutal territorial confrontations. The Foetodon has poor eyesight, but, as a solitary ambush predator, this does not impede its success. Lying concealed beneath leaves in excavated scrapes along the edges of game trails, the predator will wait patiently to ambush oblivious prey using the path. Most often these are small herbivores (like Pugiodorsus, tree-tops or one of the large flightless birds) caught unawares as they pick their way along the path, but a Foetodon takes virtually any prey available. The boorish carnivore cannot afford to be choosy. Its attitude is one of “bit first and ask questions later.” As such, much depends upon the effectiveness of the first, powerful bite. A Foetodon’s physiology is geared toward small bursts of activity with long periods of rest in between. When lunging, it can do so with frightening speed and power. The massive jaws exert a staggering pressure, enough to shatter bones and cripple, thereby ensuring that even if it fails to kill or secure the prey with the first bite, the wounded victim is unlikely to be able to escape. The species has an excellent sense of smell for tracking wounded prey. It also uses its keen nose to grub out invertebrates living amid the thick leaf litter. This veritable sea of decomposing vegetable matter can be many feet deep and hide all manner of small snacks to interest a hungry Foetodon. Indeed, the young live exclusively on these morsels while still small and conceal themselves in the detritus and in marshes from larger predators, including cannibalistic members of their own kind. No longer a water predator like its distant ancestors, a Foetodon relies upon the power of its strong, high-mounted back legs to propel it forward when striking. Because juvenile Foetodon still spend much of their lives in water, a large, powerful, broad tail (like a crocodile’s) is retained in the larger land-based adult. Foetodon sometimes suffer from a disfiguring infection picked up from the leaf litter. So virulent can the infection become that even the bones of the reptiles frequently bare cruel scars. Using the shallow ponds as nurseries, baby Foetodon swim among the weeds, hunting invertebrates and swamp-wings until old and large enough to survive ashore. During their infancy they are often prey for wading birds, the sharp pickax-like bills of herons like the great grey heron making short work of their leathery armor. The tables will be turned when the infant reptiles are grown. Juvenile Foetodon are also common prey to young Piranhadon, snapped up as they float on the surface in their nursery groups.
  • Tartarusaurus - A huge coastal predator, Tartarusaurus is found all along the northern side of Skull Island , where it preys on other coastal reptiles, such as Limusaurs (a form of amphibian), sea birds, seals, and carrion. Nomadic, Tartarusauruses follow the seal populations and will jealously defend whatever length of coast they have currently claimed as their own against any intruders, especially another Tartarusaurus. The seasonal nature of many of their coastal food sources, such as fur seals, mean Tartarusaurus's are nomadic. This brings them into frequent conflict with one another when individuals meet over kills. Large fat reserves accumulate in their tails, allowing the species to go without feeding for long periods. This stored energy grants smaller animals some reprieve in the battle to compete for survival when food is scarce. Tartarusaurus has a thick, rhinoceroslike hide that protects it from harm. Males fight each other for resources and access to females. Armed with thick, curved claws on each forelimb, males battle upright, balancing on their sturdy hind legs while they raked each other with these sycthelike claws. Despite the ferocity of these matches, their thick skins and resilient scales usually protect them from serious injury.
  • Dirt turtle - The Dirt Turtle (Foeduchelys hospes), was a curious addition to Skull Island's cast of zoological misfits. It was a remarkable species but for its habit of eating the feces of other river inhabitants like Malamagnuses. Their fecal diet was supplemented with insects and snails. The species was effectively a marshland cleanup crew, removing waste left by dinosaurs and other large animals using the waterways.
  • Termito'saurus - One of the strangest of Skull Island's unique animals was the bizarre insectivore Formicavoro. The Ant-swallower had a shared ancestry with meat-eating quadrupeds; however, it opted for a diet of termites, ants, and other small insects. With sturdy claws and protruding tusks, Termito'saurus could tear into subterranean nests and concrete-hard termitaties, allowing a remarkably mobile, long, sticky tongue to lap at the insects inside. An acute sense of smell guided the plundering animal to the nursery chambers of an ant or termite community where the protein-rich larvae could be found. Formicavoros could defend themselves with force when necessary, but their principal defense was a pair of brightly colored dorsal fans that were rapidly deployed and flashed to startle would-be predators. Solitary creatures, they paired only briefly in the breeding season. Small batches of eggs were laid in shallow, covered pits and left to develop and hatch on their own. The young dug their way to the surface, fully developed and ready to embark on their long careers as terrorizers of Skull Island's small and multilegged fauna.
  • Gigasuchoid - Descended from Spinosaurus that escaped from dinosaur parks and now lives in Skull Island. Their hindlimbs grew longer and stronger, allowing them to walk on their hindlegs, not all legs, thus resembling the outdated spinosaurus. It is a carnivore that feeds on fish, amphibians, and reptiles, but not mammals for no reason.
  • Megaspinus - Descended from Avarusaurus that became fully herbivorous. It resembles a cross between an Avarusaurus and a tapir. They are prey for many large carnivores. They are much bigger than their ancestors (hence their name), about 52 feet long and 14 tons.
  • Death Giant Crocodile - Besides native species, there are animals that are descended from ones that got introduced to Skull Island or had escaped from zoos, safari parks, sanctuaries, hunting ranches, dinosaur parks, cenozoic parks, palaeozoic parks, universal zoos, etc. Death giant crocodiles are descended from escaped deinosuchus. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Grim's Common Crocodile - Descended from escaped Nile crocodiles. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Marsh Crocodile - Descended from escaped saltwater crocodiles. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.

BirdsEdit

  • Brutornis - The largest of Skull Island's flightless avian carnivores, Brutornis was an impressive predator that ran down prey in the open scrublands. With keen sight, the bird could detect small movements in the grasses that betrayed small prey hidden below. The huge, axe like bill was driven by powerful muscles and exerted a bite terrible enough to kill most prey with a single chomp. Brutornises nested on the edges of the grassy areas, where their eggs remained concealed but the open ground permitted the parent a view of potential threats. Mothers showed intense vigilance in protecting their eggs, going without food for up to a month during incubation to remain at the nest. Chicks had camouflaged plumage for hiding and followed their mother when she hunted, until old enough to fend for themselves. Cunning Lycaesaurus developed tactics to lure Brutornis mothers off their valuable eggs. Conspicuously approaching the nest to catch the bird's eye, one Lycaesaurus would act as a decoy, luring the protective bird off her clutch while the other raided the unattended nest. A valuable protein source, the melon-sized eggs were worth the risk of teasing such a dangerous predator. The decoy animal had to judge its lead carefully. If it went too far, the Brutornis might abandon pursuit to return to its eggs; too close and the ploy could turn to disaster, the would-be egg theives becoming dinner for the starving mother.
  • Velociornis - The swiftest of all skull island animals. They inhabit the jungle. Swiftly chasing a Hylaeornis. 70 mph. They can sense prey up to 2 kilometers. High speed chases are not uncommon. And also fights. A member of skull islands terror birds. 11 feet tall
  • Zeropteryx - Skull Island was home to several species of large flightless birds. The largest were heavily built, predatory species with great axelike beaks. Zeropteryxes were among the heaviest of these, standing as high as a man and with powerful running legs and huge claws. Armed with enormous razor-tipped, spadelike beaks, they were formidable predators. Anything that moved was potential game. The bladelike edge of the bird's beak was as lethal as a pickax to small animals not fast enough to get away.
  • Pinnatono - Pinnatono amarus, is a large, flightless, wingless, moa-like notopalaeognath from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 5-6 feet tall to the hip. The Pinnatono is a flightless bird with a small head to reach inside thorny bushes for hidden berries and other fruit. Though outwardly defenseless, a Pinnatono has one ace up its feathered sleeve. Making up about a quarter of the Pinnatono’s diet is a rather noxious berry that most other species leave alone for its extremely hot flesh. Immune to its gut-scaring qualities, a Pinnatono bulk loads the fruit. In the acidic stomach of the bird it acquires newfound potency, giving off a foul gas that rises heavily from the feces, breath and pores. On command, a Pinnatono can recall its stomach contents into an inflatable gullet in its throat and regurgitate it, with surprising accuracy and projection, to discourage threats. Even the most armored of predators, like V. rexes, will avoid the acidic pulp, which causes extreme discomfort to the eyes and other sensitive parts.
  • Hylaeornis - Hylaeornis maximus, is a common, agile, flightless cariamiform from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 4-5 feet tall to the hip. The common and widespread Hylaeornis are ground-nesting birds, making their nests in the deep shadows between the roots of giant trees. Flightless, their agility and speed through the jungle is their greatest defense against predators like Dinocanisaurus, though they can deliver a kick that wise predators know to be wary of when cornered.
  • Great Grey Heron is a typical-looking ardeine heron from the wetlands of Skull Island. During their infancy, Foetodon are often prey for wading birds, the sharp pickax-like bills of herons like the great grey heron making short work of their leathery armor. The tables will be turned when the infant reptiles are grown.
  • Carrion Storks, Profanornis sp., are a genus of flightless, scavenging, carnivorous storks from the lowland plains of Skull Island. They are possibly closely related to the Leptoptilos genus. Four distinct and remarkable carrion stork species have evolved with featherless heads for digging deep into carcasses, and specialized beaks suited to specific tasks.
  • Carrion Parrots, Caropsitticus sp., are a group of omnivorous, baldheaded, scavenging, vulture-like true parrots from the lowland plains of Skull Island. Most colorful among the carrion-eaters of Skull Island are the many and varied carrion parrots. Half a dozen species coexist on the island. Exploiting a ready food source, many of Skull Island’s parrots are fulltime carrion-eaters. Strong beaks and naturally inquisitive natures make the partially featherless, raucous carrion parrots the perfect candidates for the job. Their ancestors probably arrived on the island only a few million years ago (their adaptation and diversification having occurred quickly in evolutionary timescales).
  • Foeducrista is a long-billed, flightless, carnivorous palaeognath from the lowland plains of Skull Island. Foeducrista is a primitive, flightless bird with a featherless head, a long, bright crest, and a saw-toothed bill. The serrated beak is beneficial in catching small prey and can also be used to shear off soft meat from carrion.
  • Noctupervagus, Noctupervagus pinguis, is a large, flightless, nocturnal novaeratite from the jungles of Skull Island. It measures 5-6 feet high at the hip. The nocturnal Noctupervagus is a sharp-eyed forager amid the leaf litter of the jungle floor. With a powerful kick and saw-toothed beak, the bird is quite capable of defending itself from smaller predators and more than a match for the venomous centipedes that it feeds on exclusively. Despite its size, the bird is able to delicately hold and dismember the centipedes with its foot and beak, removing the venomous mouthparts with a surgeon’s dexterity. To hide them from harm, Noctupervagus eggs are dark and covered in a rich membranous coating, ideal for the growth of small spores and mosses. Shortly after being laid, the eggs become covered in small plants and fungi, camouflaging them from predators like Dinocanisaurus while their mother feeds in the jungle nearby. The tradeoff for the protection is that the fungus and plant growth can cause difficulty for the young trying to hatch. Parental assistance is essential to a successful hatching.
  • Skull Island Lizardmen

AmphibiansEdit

  • Inox - The Inox, Inoculopalus edax, is a massive, dangerous diplocaulid from the swamps of Skull Island. It measures 12-18 feet long. A relic of a long-gone age, the large arrow-headed amphibian called the Inox has remained largely unchanged since its ancestors in the Carboniferous and Permian periods. The wide meat-eaters prefer to lurk in the stagnant pools and weed-clogged marshes of Skull Island’s waterways, where murky water and floating scum help mask their presence. Oversized distant relatives of salamanders and frogs, they are ambush predators, taking bony fish, wading birds, or anything small enough to fit down their throats, like baby Ligocristus. Despite possessing legs, the Inox prefers not to leave the water unless compelled to do so, either by lack of food or shrinking territory in times of drought. The ungainly tetrapod animal is capable of hauling itself short distances over land but is vulnerable out of the water. In their young tadpole forms, young Inoxes live in muddy creek beds, surviving on a mixed diet of carrion, insects and their grubs, small fish, and algae. They appear similar to the adults but lack back legs and the distinctive boomerang-shaped skull until fully mature.
  • Swamp-Wing - Xamopteryx, a bizarre winged, almost bat-like frog with ability of flight from the swamps of Skull Island. It has a 4-8 inch wingspan. Skull Island’s swamp-wings are among the oddest results of selective pressures on an otherwise defenseless food source. In response to the threat of predation, a variety of frog has evolved with enlarged membranes between their front digits and back along their forelimbs to their tails in a feature analogous to a bat’s wings. While the forelimbs are enlarged, the rear legs are small by frog standards and their ability to jump is limited to a boost for takeoffs. Their facial features are stunted and almost tadpole-like in appearance. Swamp-wing mouths sport a fan of needlelike “teeth.” Not true teeth, they are sharpened serrations on the frog’s jaw, protruding through their gums. Like so many of their strange features, these are unique to the genus. Swamp-wings are not accomplished flyers. The extent of their aerial prowess is frequent short-distance flights. It is a barely controlled glide, punctuated by rapid flapping fits. However, it is enough to get them from tree to tree in the swamps and away from bigger predators in the water or on land. Once mature, the species avoids swimming as much as possible. In the water they are easy prey for large bony fish (like needlemouths) and birds (like Profanornis spinosus), their wings being ill-adapted for swimming. Agile climbers, with gripping pads on their back and front digits, they live mostly on the boughs of wet-rooted trees or in floating Vegetation. Their flight is not accurate enough to allow them to reliably hunt on the wing; therefore, most of their diet is small invertebrates caught while grounded. Swamp-Wings lay eggs in clusters of hundreds, hidden amongst the reeds and water weeds in an effort to avoid the attention of larger predators. Eggs that survive the two weeks of development hatch out into tiny tadpoles that are already active hunters, pursuing small insects and other arthropods in the safety of the weeds. At seven weeks old, tiny spurs begin to form on the flanks that will eventually become legs. Forelimbs continue to grow, sprouting fingers to crawl around underwater, relying less and less on their tails for propulsion. By 12 weeks the tails begin to shrink and the eyes to bulge. By 15 weeks the youngsters resemble adults more than tadpoles. While not yet fliers, their increasing reliance on air-breathing compels them to leave the water, clambering about on logs, roots, and floating vegetation.

FishEdit

  • Piranhadon - The Piranhadon titanus, is a massive, lethal tristichopterid from the swamps and waterways of Skull Island. It grows 20-50 feet long. The unchallenged master of the waterways of Skull Island is the gargantuan Piranhadon, scientifically named more for its carnivorous habits than for any resemblance to a true piranha. A titanic lobe-finned fish, it grows as large as some whales. Piranhadon is an ambush predator, mostly taking terrestrial prey that come to drink (only to find themselves dragged down to a watery doom). Though it will also hunt below the surface, the majority of a Piranhadon’s prey is taken from the bank or plucked from the surface while attempting a crossing. Piranhadon eyes are large, but not terribly acute. Their vision is restricted to extremes of light and dark. Staring up, they will respond to shadows created against the bright light of the sky that indicates potential prey on or near the surface. Underwater prey is more difficult to discern in the murky water. Their bodies have evolved to allow short bursts of high speed, as befitted an ambush predator, but will need to rest for long periods between attacks. Massive banks of gills supply the bony fish with oxygen from the water. Water that is heavily clogged with silt makes it difficult for the species to breathe, restricting its access to the river system. Piranhadon have elongated necks that are flexible so as to allow them to weave through the flooded forests and narrow waterways they hunt in spite of their great size. Side-to-side tail movement provides propulsion, while the massive paddle-like pectoral fins steer the animal with surprising agility. Streamlined and smooth, the great beast can move swiftly through the water, creating barely a ripple on the surface to betray its passage. The larger the individual, the faster it can swim. Male Piranhadon are much smaller than the giant females, rarely exceeding 20 feet in length, and outnumber them several times over. During the mating season, the big females make no effort to accommodate the affections of their many tiny suitors. Only the strongest and fastest males can catch up with them and deposit their seed, thereby guaranteeing the best genes for their offspring. Young are born live in groups of around a dozen. Fully five feet long at birth, they are already formidable aquatic predators and take to hunting in the shallows right away. Here they perfect their ambushing techniques on water birds and small non-avian dinosaurs. Juvenile Foetodon are common prey, snapped up as they float on the surface in their nursery groups. Plagued by parasites, one of the most unconventional behaviors exhibited by Piranhadon is voluntary beaching. Selecting an appropriate beach that provides sufficient slipway for returning to the water, the fish will swim at speed up and onto the shore. Several bird species (like herons and gulls) know this behavior and will fly down to meticulously clean the aquatic predator of its unwanted passengers alongside two small lizard species. Despite the usual danger the predatory bony fish presents, while being groomed and attended it is no threat, willingly permitting enterprising cleaner birds to pick parasites and other food from between its mighty jaws. The bony fish can stay ashore for only a short time before suffocation and heat compels it to submerge. Using its huge pectoral fins to heave itself, a Piranhadon flexes and arches like a gigantic seal, sliding back into its natural habitat. Despite the serenity of the waters, Skull Island’s rivers and pools are at least as dangerous as the jungle. The deceptively serene waters hide a menagerie of terrifying creatures, among them, the nightmarish predator Piranhadon. Piranhadon hunts sections of rivers’ edges that slope steeply, permitting it to lurk very close to the beach while still remaining hidden beneath the surface. Lying along the bottom, the lobe-finned fish’s two enlarged and sensitive barbels pick up footfall vibrations through the ground that will signal the approach of potential terrestrial prey. Drawn to the bank to drink, land animals (such as Ligocristus and Hylaeornis) cast telltale silhouettes across the water’s surface as they come within range of the piscine predator’s strike. A sweep of its mighty tail will send the Piranhadon surging forward, its huge, gaping head propelling out of the water to grab the unfortunate victim. Often the prey will be lifted high into the air to crash down violently again into the boiling water, firmly trapped between the bony fish’s gin trap jaws. If still alive after the impact of the attack, prey is dragged struggling beneath the surface to be drowned and swallowed whole. Piranhadon has unusual double-hinged jaws, similar to a snake. Able to pivot in two places, the powerful lower jaw can gape wide to allow the beast to swallow very large prey with a single bite. Almost all the lobe-finned fish’s prey is taken whole, with teeth adapted for pinning instead of cutting prey.
  • Monstruselachus - The seas are home for the ultimate creatures. 15 meters long. A pack hunter. Extremely smart and are tactical. Can have up to 120 members. Has great sense of smell
  • Mega Shark - A huge monster shark. 167 feet long and 178 tons. Hunts in pairs. Have great senses, but Skull Island Water Terrors (which are piranhas) are immune to shark's senses, so sharks themselves are preyed on by piranhas.
  • Puffer Shark - Basically it puffs into a spiky venomous death trap. For piranha's it's technically a nightmare. 20 tons.
  • Venomous Spike Shark - It's rugged skin has fully transformed into spiky piranha traps. 600 tons. Hunts whales and skull island megamouth sharks
  • Death Piranha - Of course native piranhas strike back. Much more aggressive. Has venom. Is bigger. Has 100,000 members in a single pack.
  • Skull Island Megamouth Shark - Descended from megamouth sharks that were washed up into huge rivers of Skull Island. They are the largest ever fish species (including sharks) of the island, about 220 feet long. They feed on plankton and small crustaceans in its native habitat. They resemble a cross between a modern megamouth shark and a whale shark.
  • Papilio - Papilio (Papiliomonstrus opico). Barbarous Butterfly-monster, 4-5 feet long. Elaborate Papilio was easily distinguished from the similar-habited Sepulcro by its array of fanlike limbs and fins. In most respects the fish resembled its competitor, though it tended to favor invertebrate prey over fish. In the breeding seaon males would engage in graceful displays of their wide fans to impress potential mates. The broad fins were also used to stir up bottom muck in which the fish would conceal itself and await the approach of prey.
  • Sepulcro - Sepulcro (Sepulcrostium malus). Ugly Gravemouth, 4-5 feet long. Sepulcro was capable of an impressive gape. Even fish or other aquatic animals close to its own size were sometimes taken, the stomach being expandable to admit very large prey.
  • Stink Fish - Stink-fish (Foetidichthys hebeo). Sluggish Stinking-fish, 2-3 feet long. The broad-bodied Stink-fish was a slow-moving barb with a nasty surprise for would-Be predators. Glands on the inside walls of the anus produced a powerful chemical cocktail that could be released in a cloud of evacuation when threatened. The milky cloud of chemicals and waste was potent enough to deter even the most hungry attacker. It also possessed an adhesive quality that bound it to the skin for some time after contact, its nauseating taste ensuring the memory of the encounter. Cosequently, Stink-fish were among the only inhabitants of the swamps and waterways able to roam carefree and without fear amid even the most fearsome of aquatic killers.
  • Sparkleside - The Sparkleside (Micocallum pearci, meaning Pearce's Sparkle-hide) is a fish native to skull island's waterways, similar to a milkfish in appearance. The skull island's mullet species micocallum made their way up and down the river,
  • Killer-Eel - Killer-eel (Letalihydrus despicatus, meaning Contemptible Deadly-serpent), 2-3 feet long. The scourge of the waterways of Skull Island was the swarming Killer-eel. Appropriately named, the bug-eyed fish. were lethal in numbers. When attacking, their razor sharp teeth shredded skin and flesh to ribbons in no time. Not true eels, but a unique species related to lampreys, Killer-eels staked claim to sections of river they patrolled and guarded jealously. Schools of up to a hundred hunted together. Injured or sick prey, fish or reptile, were the preferred variety. Their tactics involved overwhelming an animal with multiple attacks, each member of the school surging in to rasp bite-sized chunks of flesh out of the prey. Slow prey was the mainstay of their diet, as the Killers could not sustain high-energy activity for long periods without resting. For the majority of the time the schools swam slowly, expending as little energy as possible, until one eel would come upon a pontential food source. Then, spurred into activity by the scent of blood in the water, the entire school would attack, overwhelming the prey and often stripping it to the bone with their many-toothed, circular mouths within minutes like piranha's do. Killer-eels' eggs were laid in sticky masses in the water weeds, but suffered dreadful attrition, being food to many small fish and invertebrate species. Coupled with short life spans, this helped keep their numbers in check. The species was also very vulnerable to changes in water temperature or acidity. Even small charges, if too sudden, could have disastrous consequences for a school.
  • Megaxiphactinus - Skull islands seas are filled with dangerous icthyodectidae. 12 meters long and 25 tons. They take the niche of great white sharks
  • Needlemouth - Needlemouth (Acusos cadaverosus)Ghastly Needle-mouth, it is about 9-13 feet long. An aggressive predator of the rivers, the Needlemouth is an extremely intelligent, pack-hunting garlike hunter found throughout the streams and tributaries of the island. Needlemouths are swift and maneuverable, able to negotiate the leaf-choked jungle streams in pursuit of their favorite prey, small and midsized fish. These incredibly impressive hunters are the sharks of the waterways. While many of the reptilian river carnivores are ambush hunters, groups of 3-9 Needlemouths can chase down their fast-moving prey, matching their speed and turns in flat-out races, reaching a top speed of 31-56mph and able to sustain such speeds for relatively long periods of time. 
  • Bloodfish - The Bloodfish (Sanguichthys rufus, meaning Red Bloodfish) is a cyprinid which inhabited Skull island's backwater canals and freshwater estuaries. Its bright red coloring is thought to provide it camouflage against the murky tannin stained water that was its preferred habitat. The ancestor of blood fish was thought to have been a barb in the puntius genus. It was theorized that the ancestral blood fish was introduced to skull island around eight thousand years ago by proto-Malayan's who sought to settle the island. The barb was likely imported as a domestic food fish. Exactly how the islanders transported the fish to the island is an enigma, however the success of their efforts hint at an extremely high level of technological sophistication. Following their arrival(as with all alien species) the barbs escaped into wild waterways. Skull island's native class of fish Dipterus, were an extremely diverse cast of lungfish, relics of the Permian period. Because of their isolation, evolution left them woefully unprepared for the barbs. Soon intense competition for food and attrition from foreign disease drove most of the lungfish to extinction. The two remaining species included the infamous piranhadon and the grotesque skull island panderichthys malus.(which only superficially resembled the Devonian age panderichthys) having wiped out most of the indigenous fish species the barbs diversified into the myriad of fish germane to skull island. Soon vacated niches were filled by an eccentric freakshow From the clumsy stink fish to the vicious needle mouth, and the rosy red blood fish. The barbs essentially replaced the lungfish. In skull island's freshwater ecosystem blood fish are omnivorous opportunists which kept the local insect populace in check. During the breeding season of death wasps and needle gnats vast schools of blood fish congregate near the surface feasting on larvae and unwary adults. During seasons when the insects migrate away from water the blood fish can revert to their barb like habits and scavenged detritus from the water beds. Blood fish is the most popular prey for medium sized skull island aquatic predators. A few neopedes subsisted entirely on them.
  • Panderichthys - (Panderichthys malus, meaning Ugly Pander's-fish) is a fish native to skull island's waterways, similar to a lungfish in appearance.
  • Skull Island River Shark - Skull island is infamous for their marine predators. 40 feet long and 12 tons. They hunt malamagnus and other unsuspecting prey. They can track up to 1 Km away.
  • Hyneria - Descended from ones that escaped from Palaeozoic aquariums. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but it now has true lungs, in case if the lake or river it lives in dries out and can move into a new lake or river using its strong fins that are packed with muscles.
  • Megaichthysus - Descended from Dunkleosteus that escaped from Palaeozoic aquariums. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skull Island Water Terror - Descended from introduced piranhas that lives in Skull Island's freshwater habitats. They are a lot more aggressive, more carnivorous, and more social than their ancestors, living in groups up to about 10,000 members in one area. They are the most dangerous native fish of Skull Island.

Net-NavisEdit

  • Bass.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Bass.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Bass.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They can hover, have darkness, Aura powers, and are almost invincible, having many powers and are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items they need in order to survive) or want. They are nocturnal, as they can blend in the dark to hunt deer, ibex, wild sheep, and other animals. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games.
  • Megaman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Megaman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Megaman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They have many powers and are almost invincible, they are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive). They are mostly diurnal, but can be nocturnal to keep an eye out for their only natural predators, Bass.EXEs and Elecman.EXEs. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are peaceful, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime, but can fight back if threatened.
  • Protoman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Protoman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Protoman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They have many powers, and are almost invincible, they are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive) or want. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are sometimes hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime.
  • Elecman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Elecman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Elecman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They can hover, have electric powers, and are very strong, having many powers and are almost impossible to avoid, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive) or want. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime.
  • Plantman.EXE - In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered universe travel. People have brought many species and sapient beings, including Net-Navis from Megaman Battle Network. After humans left Earth, Plantman.EXE (a Net-Navi) clones had escaped from laboratories, starting their population. Their descendants now includes not just males, but also female Plantman.EXEs, allowing them to survive in the world without humans. They have many powers, and are almost invincible, they are almost impossible to kill, according to the Megaman Battle Network games and anime, and can attack anything they need (including prey items in order to survive) or want. They have even more advanced intelligence, culture, tech, etc. than humans. They are similar to their ancestors from Megaman Battle Network series. They eat the similar kind of food as modern humans. They are sometimes hostile, according to Megaman Battle Network games and anime.